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Post-Baccalaureate

PB300 - Post Bacc Independent Studio, 6-9 credits
Post-Baccalaureate Independent Studio: In consultation with their mentor, each student will undertake in-depth, self-determined, studio exploration, engage in research relevant to their studio work, and participate in critique and dialog. Students may choose to take Independent Studio for six or nine credits depending upon their desire/need to take an additional Elective or an Internship.

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MFA in Applied Craft and Design

ACD500 - MFA ACD Independent Study, 3 credits
Independent Study requires approval of the Dept. Chair

ACD501 - Studio Practice - 6 credits
With students’ individual spaces located in a workshop environment, this Program embraces an approach to design rooted in the culture of making, and emphasizes learning from materials to ground concepts. A central feature of the studio experience is the one-on-one interaction with a mentor selected by the student and Program Chair. The mentor-student relationship is personal and unique, and is at the heart of the MFA in Applied Craft and Design Program. The mentor acts as advocate, critic, resource, and colleague for the student, providing a supportive setting to pursue self-designed, independent investigation and experimentation. The mentor meets with the student for approximately 1.5 hours per week, guiding the student in his/her explorations, discussing the student’s goals, and fostering an awareness of social, environmental and ethical concerns and responsibilities in the student’s creative practice. Mentors are selected from a group of accomplished artists, designers, makers, and faculty. The Program will connect the student with a mentor whose expertise is directly relevant to the student’s focus.

ACD502 - Studio Practice, 6 credits
With students’ individual spaces located in a workshop environment, this Program embraces an approach to design rooted in the culture of making, and emphasizes learning from materials to ground concepts. A central feature of the studio experience is the one-on-one interaction with a mentor selected by the student and Program Chair. The mentor-student relationship is personal and unique, and is at the heart of the MFA in Applied Craft and Design Program. The mentor acts as advocate, critic, resource, and colleague for the student, providing a supportive setting to pursue self-designed, independent investigation and experimentation. The mentor meets with the student for approximately 1.5 hours per week, guiding the student in his/her explorations, discussing the student’s goals, and fostering an awareness of social, environmental and ethical concerns and responsibilities in the student’s creative practice. Mentors are selected from a group of accomplished artists, designers, makers, and faculty.The Program will connect the student with a mentor whose expertise is directly relevant to the student’s focus.

ACD525 - Critique Seminar, 3 credits
Through Seminar, students engage in thorough, critical analysis of work-in-progress, benefiting from in-depth exposure to the wide variety of disciplines represented in the program. This course includes group critiques with guest critics, studio and design firm visits, workshops, and one-on-one dialogue with leading contemporary practitioners and theorists through the Program’s Visiting Artists Series. Emphasis is placed on cultivating the synergistic relationship between the act of making and designing, as well as on seeking opportunities for cross-pollination between disciplines. Students working with metal, for instance, are encouraged to look for possibilities to incorporate or adapt conceptual and technical approaches of students working with wood, ceramics, or fibers, etc. In Seminar students explore issues and topics such as: the relationship of identity and status to material processes; the impact of knowledge-based social policy on craft culture; the concept of gesamtkunstwerk in contemporary society; and the potential for integration of the hand-made into computer based, menu-driven design assemblies.

ACD526 - Critique Seminar, 3 credits
Through Seminar, students engage in thorough, critical analysis of work-in-progress, benefiting from in-depth exposure to the wide variety of disciplines represented in the program. This course includes group critiques with guest critics, studio and design firm visits, workshops, and one-on-one dialogue with leading contemporary practitioners and theorists through the Program’s Visiting Artists Series. Emphasis is placed on cultivating the synergistic relationship between the act of making and designing, as well as on seeking opportunities for cross-pollination between disciplines. Students working with metal, for instance, are encouraged to look for possibilities to incorporate or adapt conceptual and technical approaches of students working with wood, ceramics, or fibers, etc. In Seminar students explore issues and topics such as: the relationship of identity and status to material processes; the impact of knowledge-based social policy on craft culture; the concept of gesamtkunstwerk in contemporary society; and the potential for integration of the hand-made into computer based, menu-driven design assemblies.

ACD535 - Creative Entrepreneurship I, 3 credits
The Creative Entrepreneurship course provides a comprehensive introduction to establishing and sustaining a creative entrepreneurial endeavor, with an emphasis on professional arts practices and strategies for small businesses. The course is structured as a series of modules overseen by the instructor, exposing students to the fundamentals of business, marketing, and financial planning for a hybrid based arts practice or small business.

Through intense thematic workshops students develop a creative business pitch, explore strategies for networking and self promotion, and learn the basic fundamentals related to legal, tax, and accounting issues. In support of the Program’s philosophy of engagement through service learning, each student networks with creative professionals through off campus studio visits and potential internship opportunities. Prerequisites: Students outside of the Applied Craft + Design Program: Permission of instructor

The year-long course is organized across two semesters, breaking each semester into quarterly modules that serve as intense thematic workshops. Each thematic workshop results in one to three assignments and requires students to make and produce materials outside of class (six required hours per week). The modules are a la carte, tailored to the specific interests of an arts based practice or a small business, resulting in personalized curriculum.

ACD533 - MFA ACD Internship, 3 credits
Internship requires approval of the Dept. Chair 3

ACD551 - Modern Craft & Design History, 3 credits
Critical Studies courses challenge students to develop in-depth knowledge of social and environmental movements in Modern craft and design history, articulate positions in discussions concerning contemporary craft and design theory, and place current trends in making into a global context. Studies in modern craft and design history emphasize a careful engagement with key individuals and movements rather than a comprehensive survey. Students focus not only on the history of these fields, but on the critical discussion of the scholarship that frames them. In becoming fluent in contemporary theory, students investigate the DIY movement, concepts such as valorization of the hand, and the shifting boundaries and relationships between fine art, craft, and design. Examining the transformation of craft traditions and adaptive reuse of materials in craft and design globally — and in developing countries in particular — students explore notions of individual and collective identity. In support of the Program's emphasis on applied knowledge, students are required to submit research papers to peer-reviewed journals or conferences in each of the three Critical Studies courses.

ACD552 Critical Studies: Theory of the Object, 3 credits
This course attempts to map productive, perhaps unexpected, interfaces between craft, design, art, architecture, and technology, and develop means for thinking about emerging disciplines and applications that may synthesize them in interesting ways. Our questions include: What are the relations between material culture, thought, creativity, tradition, and innovation? What is a thing in the age of the telematic, and what is its fate? What does it mean to speak of an "impossible object"? What are the relations between hand and mind, human and machine, making and thinking, objects and systems, and what are the ramifications of their interaction for perception, sensibility, and intelligence? Part of our task will entail looking at some things that may or may not be things, from pots, rings, and wheels to puzzles, labyrinths, and column capitals to photographs, money, and prims to applications that utilize the perennial techniques of craft in novel fashion, for example, textile weaving as a model for 3-D tissue-regeneration scaffolding. Criteria for judgment include scale, texture, contrast, material, dimensionality, process, pattern, hapticity, interactivity, function, and use-value, among others. Readings include works by Flusser, Kubler, Heidegger, Benjamin, Belting, McLuhan, Bachelard, Perec, Summers, Lacan, Ruskin, Tufte, and Focillon. By the end of the course, students will be able to think critically and creatively about questions relevant to their discipline, exhibit mastery of a sophisticated lexicon, and explore interesting conjunctions of theory and practice in their work and that of others.

ACD601 Studio Practice, 6 credits
With students’ individual spaces located in a workshop environment, this Program embraces an approach to design rooted in the culture of making, and emphasizes learning from materials to ground concepts. A central feature of the studio experience is the one-on-one interaction with a mentor selected by the student and Program Chair. The mentor-student relationship is personal and unique, and is at the heart of the MFA in Applied Craft and Design Program. The mentor acts as advocate, critic, resource, and colleague for the student, providing a supportive setting to pursue self-designed, independent investigation and experimentation. The mentor meets with the student for approximately 1.5 hours per week, guiding the student in his/her explorations, discussing the student’s goals, and fostering an awareness of social, environmental and ethical concerns and responsibilities in the student’s creative practice. Mentors are selected from a group of accomplished artists, designers, makers, and faculty. The Program will connect the student with a mentor whose expertise is directly relevant to the student’s focus.

ACD602 - Studio Practice, 6 credits
With students’ individual spaces located in a workshop environment, this Program embraces an approach to design rooted in the culture of making, and emphasizes learning from materials to ground concepts. A central feature of the studio experience is the one-on-one interaction with a mentor selected by the student and Program Chair. The mentor-student relationship is personal and unique, and is at the heart of the MFA in Applied Craft and Design Program. The mentor acts as advocate, critic, resource, and colleague for the student, providing a supportive setting to pursue self-designed, independent investigation and experimentation. The mentor meets with the student for approximately 1.5 hours per week, guiding the student in his/her explorations, discussing the student’s goals, and fostering an awareness of social, environmental and ethical concerns and responsibilities in the student’s creative practice. Mentors are selected from a group of accomplished artists, designers, makers, and faculty. The Program will connect the student with a mentor whose expertise is directly relevant to the student’s focus.

ACD625 - Critique Seminar, 3 credits
Through Seminar, students engage in thorough, critical analysis of work-in-progress, benefiting from in-depth exposure to the wide variety of disciplines represented in the program. This course includes group critiques with guest critics, studio and design firm visits, workshops, and one-on-one dialogue with leading contemporary practitioners and theorists through the Program’s Visiting Artists Series. Emphasis is placed on cultivating the synergistic relationship between the act of making and designing, as well as on seeking opportunities for cross-pollination between disciplines. Students working with metal, for instance, are encouraged to look for possibilities to incorporate or adapt conceptual and technical approaches of students working with wood, ceramics, or fibers, etc. In Seminar students explore issues and topics such as: the relationship of identity and status to material processes; the impact of knowledge-based social policy on craft culture; the concept of gesamtkunstwerk in contemporary society; and the potential for integration of the hand-made into computer based, menu-driven design assemblies.

ACD626 - Critique Seminar, 3 credits
Through Seminar, students engage in thorough, critical analysis of work-in-progress, benefiting from in-depth exposure to the wide variety of disciplines represented in the program. This course includes group critiques with guest critics, studio and design firm visits, workshops, and one-on-one dialogue with leading contemporary practitioners and theorists through the Program’s Visiting Artists Series. Emphasis is placed on cultivating the synergistic relationship between the act of making and designing, as well as on seeking opportunities for cross-pollination between disciplines. Students working with metal, for instance, are encouraged to look for possibilities to incorporate or adapt conceptual and technical approaches of students working with wood, ceramics, or fibers, etc. In Seminar students explore issues and topics such as: the relationship of identity and status to material processes; the impact of knowledge-based social policy on craft culture; the concept of gesamtkunstwerk in contemporary society; and the potential for integration of the hand-made into computer based, menu-driven design assemblies.

ACD635 - Creative Entrepreneurship II, 3 credits
The Creative Entrepreneurship course provides a comprehensive introduction to establishing and sustaining a creative entrepreneurial endeavor, with an emphasis on professional arts practices and strategies for small businesses. The course is structured as a series of modules overseen by the instructor, exposing students to the fundamentals of business, marketing, and financial planning for a hybrid based arts practice or small business.

Through intense thematic workshops students develop a creative business pitch, explore strategies for networking and self promotion, and learn the basic fundamentals related to legal, tax, and accounting issues. In support of the Program’s philosophy of engagement through service learning, each student networks with creative professionals through off campus studio visits and potential internship opportunities. Prerequisites: Applied Craft + Design Students are required to take ACD535 to enter into ACD635. Students outside of the Applied Craft + Design Program: Permission of instructor. The year-long course is organized across two semesters, breaking each semester into quarterly modules that serve as intense thematic workshops. Each thematic workshop results in one to three assignments and requires students to make and produce materials outside of class (six required hours per week). The modules are a la carte, tailored to the specific interests of an arts based practice or a small business, resulting in personalized curriculum.

ACD671 - Practicum, 3 credits
The Practicum is similar to a Thesis, but emphasizes practical application of knowledge or skill in a new way, through an independent project approved by the student’s committee. The main thrust of the Practicum is to create work through engagement with a specific community, client, or user, and with an emphasis on addressing social and environmental concerns. The type and scale of projects students pursue for the Practicum ranges widely, but is centrally informed by the act of making and design-thinking. The Practicum is intended to be an externalized expression of the work produced in Studio Practice, and requires a capstone paper. In preparing the rationale for their proposal, students pursue rigorous methods of applied research, as well as utilizing strategies to identify and interact with various stakeholders. Students present reports of their progress to their committee at preliminary and intermediate stages. Upon completion, the Practicum culminates in a formal public presentation.

ACD672 - Practicum, 3 credits
The Practicum is similar to a Thesis, but emphasizes practical application of knowledge or skill in a new way, through an independent project approved by the student’s committee. The main thrust of the Practicum is to create work through engagement with a specific community, client, or user, and with an emphasis on addressing social and environmental concerns. The type and scale of projects students pursue for the Practicum ranges widely, but is centrally informed by the act of making and design-thinking. The Practicum is intended to be an externalized expression of the work produced in Studio Practice, and requires a capstone paper. In preparing the rationale for their proposal, students pursue rigorous methods of applied research, as well as utilizing strategies to identify and interact with various stakeholders. Students present reports of their progress to their committee at preliminary and intermediate stages. Upon completion, the Practicum culminates in a formal public presentation.

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MFA in Collaborative Design

COL500 - Studio Elective, 3 credits
MFA in Collaborative Design Electives - THE INSTITUTES IN COLLABORATIVE DESIGN are a series of workshops that introduce new design strategies and methods for stakeholder engagement. Each workshop is led by a different innovator in the design field. Past presenters include Carl DiSalvo, Tad Hirsch, Catherine Kramer, Stewart Long, Sara Huston, and Don Harker. Their inquiries into the intersections of politics, engineering, environmentalism, and design have resulted in a range of provocative and innovative projects.Topics of exploration have included web-based networks that regulate social and environmental accountability, mapping software that enables people to avoid CCTV surveillance, traditional ecological knowledge mapping, ecosystem design, process design for tsunami cleanup, gardening robots, edible clouds, and cross-species picnics.

COL501 - Collaborative Design Studio, 3 credits
Collaborative Design Studios are structured to give students a hands-on experience of working intimately with clients, collaborators and partners, and to go through the process of formulating a project that must be client-centric. Each studio begins with a design brief and initial resources, moves to problems and challenges, ideation, prototype solutions, and finishes with deliverables. Studio design briefs will adapt each year to local, regional and global opportunities, as well as faculty and student interests. Topic area include: Design Ethnography, Product Design, Living Systems Design, Redesign, Participatory Design, Disruptive Design, Institutional Design, Video Design, Sound Design, Rapid Prototyping, Design Essentials, Science, Policy & Design.

COL502 - CD Studio II, 3 credits
Graduate Studios are structured to give students a hands-on experience of working intimately with clients, collaborators and partners, and to go through the process of formulating a client-centric project. Each studio will facilitate a pattern of discovery, proposal, and build, where students are presented with – or develop - a design brief, and collaboratively create potential design solutions. Graduate Studio topics will adapt each year to local, regional and global opportunities and concerns, as well as faculty and student interests.

COL511 - Workshop, 1 credit
Graduate Workshops are a chance for students to build specific skills in a studio intensive. The role of the workshop instructor is to bring domain expertise or a thoughtful plan for experimentation that allows students to acquire a set of skills, techniques or way of working. This workshop experience will encourage collaborative and independent practice while supporting the individual student’s needs. Also offering - THE INSTITUTES IN COLLABORATIVE DESIGN are a series of workshops that introduce new design strategies and methods for stakeholder engagement. Each workshop is led by a different innovator in the design field. Past presenters include Carl DiSalvo, Tad Hirsch, Catherine Kramer, Stewart Long, Sara Huston, and Don Harker. Their inquiries into the intersections of politics, engineering, environmentalism, and design have resulted in a range of provocative and innovative projects. Topics of exploration have included web-based networks that regulate social and environmental accountability, mapping software that enables people to avoid CCTV surveillance, traditional ecological knowledge mapping, ecosystem design, process design for tsunami cleanup, gardening robots, edible clouds, and cross-species picnics.

COL525 - Graduate Critique Seminar, 3 credits
This seminar introduces students to local, regional and global environmental - social - economic issues and stakeholders, to help students present their work in a professional manner, to articulate the issues their work is intended to address, and to formulate a basis of evaluation of their work and the work of others. The course will specifically explore issues and stakeholders relevant to students’ individual practices, potential projects and portfolios. The seminar will meet weekly to critique, in rotation, the work-in-progress of all candidates and studio lab teams. The seminar will include visiting artists and scholars, critiques with academic and industry experts, and off-campus trips to regional community stakeholders. During each graduate seminar students will work on the development of their capstone project.

COL526 - Graduate Critique Seminar: Research + Insights, 3 credits
The course is intended to introduce students to various design research methodologies both in theory and practice including, but not limited to, qualitative and quantitative research utilizing the following lenses: Anthropologist, Scientist, Designer, Journalist, Marketer and Historian. The seminar will specifically explore design methodologies and issues/stakeholders relevant to students’ individual practices, potential projects and proposed capstones. The seminar will meet weekly offering a mixture of lecture, field trips, guest speakers, and critique. Students will be expected to engage in research resulting in written, visual and oral presentations.

COL533 - Collaborative Design Internship, 1 credit
Collaborative Design Internship requires approval of the Dept. Chair in MFA Collaborative Design.

COL535 - Collaborative Design Independent Study, 1 credit
Collaborative Design Independent Study requires approval of the Dept. Chair in MFA Collaborative Design.

COL551 - Critical Studies, 3 credits
In this course, we will examine social-ecological systems and regimes from a specific perspective: the roles of public and private individuals and organizations as agents of change. Seeking a systemic and critical understanding of ethical bases for social activism, we will discuss successes and failures of current social-ecological regimes (“business as usual”) in providing for social wellbeing, as well as the bases for considering the wellbeing of nature more broadly. We will examine the composition and relative stability of regimes, and we will examine frameworks for understanding and assessing the effectiveness of social inquiries and interventions aimed at regime transformation.

COL552 - Critical Studies, 3 credits
Through lectures, discussions, and field trips we will explore successful strategies of designing for complexity in Portland, Oregon. The instructor and guest presenters will discuss iterative, generative and transdisciplinary design processes as they relate to dynamic systems. Skills such as matrix mapping, creating cooperative networks, adaptive processes and effective means of client engagement will be demonstrated. This course will explore successful strategies for creating solutions for diverse ecological, social and economic issues. It will also train students to recognize the design opportunities through system indicators in the world around them. Students will develop their own design epistemology and tool kit for strategic planning.

COL601 - Studio Capstone, 3 credits
Collaborative Design Studios are structured to give students a hands-on experience of working intimately with clients, collaborators and partners, and to go through the process of formulating a project that must be client-centric. Each studio begins with a design brief and initial resources, moves to problems and challenges, ideation, prototype solutions, and finishes with deliverables. Studio design briefs will adapt each year to local, regional and global opportunities, as well as faculty and student interests. Topic area include: Design Ethnography, Product Design, Living Systems Design, Redesign, Participatory Design, Disruptive Design, Institutional Design, Video Design, Sound Design, Rapid Prototyping, Design Essentials, Science, Policy & Design.

COL602 - Studio Capstone, 3 credits
Graduate Studios are structured to give students a hands-on experience of working intimately with clients, collaborators and partners, and to go through the process of formulating a client-centric project. Each studio will facilitate a pattern of discovery, proposal, and build, where students are presented with – or develop - a design brief, and collaboratively create potential design solutions. Graduate Studio topics will adapt each year to local, regional and global opportunities and concerns, as well as faculty and student interests.

COL611 - Workshop Graduate, 1 credit
Workshops are a chance for students to build specific skills in a studio intensive. The role of the workshop instructor is to bring domain expertise or a thoughtful plan for experimentation that allows students to acquire a set of skills, techniques or way of working. This workshop experience will encourage collaborative and independent practice while supporting the individual student’s needs.

COL625 - Graduate Critique Seminar: Collaboration, Facilitation, Participation, 3 credits
This course will explore different models of collaboration, facilitation and participation as they apply to local, regional and global ecological -social - economic issues and stakeholders, help students to present their work in a professional manner, to articulate the issues their work is intended to address, and to formulate a basis of evaluation of their work and the work of others. It will also explore these models as they apply to students’ individual practices, potential projects and portfolios. The seminar will meet weekly to critique, in rotation, the work-in-progress of all candidates and studio lab teams. The seminar will include visiting artists and scholars, critiques with academic and industry experts, and off-campus trips to regional community stakeholders.

COL626 - Graduate Critique Seminar: Capstone, 3 credits
Capstone seminar is intended to help students realize a successful final project by providing structure and guidance during the completion of the capstone. This course provides students with an opportunity to present, refine and receive feedback on their capstone project. Regular presentations and critiques of capstone projects will be supplemented with small workshops, lectures and site visits throughout the semester. It is essential that students meet each milestone and deadline provided in the course syllabus in order to remain in good standing in the program.

COL652 - Critical Studies: Creative Leadership, 3 credits
This course helps participants refine skills for professional life. By the end of the course students will have a thoughtful and well-designed online presence that presents the individual and their work to potential collaborators and employers. Participants will have an updated CV and a pdf portfolio. Students will develop a personalized job / grant tracking system and will have successfully completed job and/or grant applications. Students are also given the opportunity to initiate a kickstarter or other online crowd-sourced funding project, and develop an exhibition strategy for presenting their capstone to the public.

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MA in Critical Studies

CS501 - Critical Theory 1: Introduction, 3 credits
This seminar is an introduction to major concepts and questions in critical theory, beginning with key figures in the Frankfurt School and moving through feminism, critical race theory, and postcolonial criticism. The seminar claims critical theory as a creative project of analysis and exposure radically interested in accountability and the material effects of ideas. Because the course is taught in the context of an art school, we will pay particular attention to images, exploring overlaps and tensions between critical theory and visual studies and investigating the role critical theory and art can play in transforming institutions and ideologies.

CS502 - Critical Theory 2: Critical Race Theory, Postcolonial Theory, 3 credits
This seminar explores Critical Race Theory, Postcolonial Theory as analytical frameworks that provide epistemological and methodological approaches to the study of structural inequalities. The seminar takes as its starting point Critical Race Theory’s insistence that racism is pervasive, persistent, and ongoing and examines how institutional racism, colonialism, and imperialism are embedded in institutions, laws, practices, and policies. The seminar approaches “race” as a social construction with material effects (racism) and investigates the roles language, images, and other forms of cultural production play in racism, (de)colonization, and resistance movements. The seminar will combine required content with opportunities for intense engagement with specialized topics the student chooses to explore more deeply related to their thesis work. Students will be encouraged to connect assigned texts to their own areas of expertise and research interests.

CS521 - Research for a Creative Practice 1, 3 credits
This seminar explores the connection between critical theory and creative research, providing a framework for students to pose questions and incorporate qualitative research methodologies into ongoing inquiry. The emphasis is on research as a process of critical engagement for observing connections between seemingly disparate ideas, planning future actions and strategies, and asking better questions. The seminar will investigate how power (mis)shapes knowledge production and will introduce students to a range of qualitative research methods and examples of creative inquiries that cross the boundaries of discipline and genre. By the end of the class, students will identify the questions that will frame their thesis research and writing, and the methods they will use to investigate those questions.

CS522 - Research for a Creative Practice 2, 3 credits
This seminar approaches thesis research as a process of revealing, challenging, and dismantling systems of oppression—and reimagining alternatives. By the end of the seminar, students will have written a literature review of relevant theorists, artists, and creative practices that will inform their thesis work and will be prepared to transform core concepts and questions into a novel, researchable project that will make a contribution to the field. In addition, students will develop presentation skills for clearly communicating research ideas with theoretical and methodological rigor to various audiences. At the end of the term during Focus Week, student will make public presentation of their proposed projects, which will be evaluated by a panel composed of faculty, artists, and community stakeholders.

CS525 Ethics & Visual Culture, 3 credits
This seminar explores critical theory as a critique of seeing. The course models the program’s combination of critical theory and creative research and investigates practices of looking and the production, circulation, and effects of visual images. When images can be used both to liberate and to oppress, to save and to kill, what does it mean to be an artist? What does it mean to be a viewer? This seminar investigates how images are used both to construct and resist “otherness.” Drawing on visual studies, critical theory, religious studies, performance theory, rhetorical analysis, and ethics, the seminar attends to the responsibilities of image-makers and image consumers; the roles of artists and viewers in an image-saturated culture; the use of images to create difference; and questions about how human beings engage language and images to make and unmake worlds.

CS526 - Creative Non-Fiction Writing, 3 credits
In this writing workshop, students will explore the broad genre of creative nonfiction—from small-scale constraint based writing exercises to the personal essay to academic articles to art reviews to non-narrative poetry and beyond. Through a variety of writing exercises, experiments, and reading assignments, we will play with language, content, and form. Emphasis is placed on experimentation and argument as means to develop a personal vocabulary while initiating a self-directed writing practice. A series of visiting writers will assist us in this work. The course is designed to support graduate students preparing for thesis writing, visual artists who use language and text in their work, and creative writers.

CS536 - Internship & Seminar, 3 credits
Working with BridgeLab, students will design a credit-bearing internship. To get the most out of their internships, students will meet in a bi-weekly seminar to make meaning of their experiences, interrogate the relationship between internships and their thesis work, and develop future plans for critical and engaged work in the world.

CS630 - Professional Practice, 9 credits
In this seminar, students develop effective professional strategies to successfully pursue a chosen career path upon completion of the CS program. The course helps students identify opportunities for achieving meaningful career objectives and for making a contribution as a critical citizen. Students learn concrete professional skills: curriculum vitae formatting, email and communication etiquette, letter writing, interviewing, public speaking, job search resources, portfolio development, and how to apply for opportunities (which may include PhD programs, teaching positions, publications, grants, fellowships, internships, residencies, or exhibitions). The objective is to prepare the future CS graduate to identify, plan and pursue a strategy for meaningful career development and a rewarding professional life in which their talents translate into a significant critical cultural contribution.

CS631 - Thesis Writing 1, 6 credits
This thesis workshop seminar is intended to support students as they complete and defend a successful master’s thesis for the CS program. The thesis (30-50 pages) will be both critical and constructive; that is, it should reveal, challenge, and dismantle systems of oppression, while also reimagining possible ways forward. The course will provide students with opportunities to present, refine, and receive feedback on their written work. Regular reviews of drafts will occur in a combination of writing workshops, assigned critical friends groups, and meetings with the professor throughout the semester. Each student will be provided with an additional mentor with expertise in their area of investigation. Final thesis work will be presented to a panel of faculty, artists, and community stakeholders at the start of the spring semester.

CS632 - Thesis Writing 2: Preparing for Publication, 6 credits
Due to the fact that so much graduate writing ends up gathering dust on library shelves or serving as doorstops, this workshop is designed to help students prepare their thesis work for publication in the world. At the beginning of the semester, students will present and defend their completed thesis paper to a panel composed of faculty, artists, and community stakeholders. In addition to evaluating the thesis work, the panel will also help students determine the next shape(s) their thesis work should take and the best venues for its distribution. The form of publication will depend on the student’s area of interest and professional practice plans—perhaps an essay for Art Forum, articles for peer-reviewed academic journals, a mission statement and business plan for a non-profit, a series of critical art essays, a community manifesto, a zine, or something else entirely.

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MFA in Print Media

PRM501 - Print Media - Graduate Studio, 3 credits
Graduate Studio, the foundation of the 60-credit, two-year MFA in Print Media program, students take an individualized approach to their education, synthesizing their diverse experiences into their work. Students work in private studios within a shared community environment, where cross-disciplinary exchange is highly encouraged. Studio practice is guided by faculty mentors who meet with students weekly to provide critique, dialogue, and occasional assignments geared toward the individual student's creative investigations. Graduate Studio culminates in an exhibition of work and a written thesis presented at the end of the second year. In addition to working with faculty mentors, students meet for group critiques and on-campus activities.

PRM502 - Print Media - Graduate Studio, 3 credits
Graduate Studio, the foundation of the 60-credit, two-year MFA in Print Media program, students take an individualized approach to their education, synthesizing their diverse experiences into their work. Students work in private studios within a shared community environment, where cross-disciplinary exchange is highly encouraged. Studio practice is guided by faculty mentors who meet with students weekly to provide critique, dialogue, and occasional assignments geared toward the individual student's creative investigations. Graduate Studio culminates in an exhibition of work and a written thesis presented at the end of the second year. In addition to working with faculty mentors, students meet for group critiques and on-campus activities.

PRM525 - Graduate Critique Seminar, 3 credits
Taken all four semesters by all students in the Print Media program, the Graduate Critique Seminar provides candidates with an intellectual community and critical forum in which they may test, temper, and enlarge the ideas that underlie their artistic goals. The Seminar will meet weekly to critique, in rotation, the work-in-progress of all candidates. The cross-disciplinary nature of the conversation is meant to foster the widest possible dialogue among artists, encourage divergent thinking and discourage the easy acceptance of received notions. The seminar will also include lectures, critiques, and discussions with Visiting Artists/Scholars/Critics. The Seminar is led by one of the MFA in Print Media faculty, who may also enlist other faculty members, as well as visiting artists, critics and scholars, to join discussions and critiques. Students may also be assigned critical readings to prepare for presentation and discussion, and class meetings would be supplemented by lectures and performances of visiting artists to PNCA, as well as by trips off-campus to exhibitions and performances locally and beyond.

PRM526 - Graduate Critique Seminar, 3 credits
Taken all four semesters by all students in the Print Media program, the Graduate Critique Seminar provides candidates with an intellectual community and critical forum in which they may test, temper, and enlarge the ideas that underlie their artistic goals. The Seminar will meet weekly to critique, in rotation, the work-in-progress of all candidates. The cross-disciplinary nature of the conversation is meant to foster the widest possible dialogue among artists, encourage divergent thinking and discourage the easy acceptance of received notions. The seminar will also include lectures, critiques, and discussions with Visiting Artists/Scholars/Critics. The Seminar is led by one of the MFA in Print Media faculty, who may also enlist other faculty members, as well as visiting artists, critics and scholars, to join discussions and critiques. Students may also be assigned critical readings to prepare for presentation and discussion, and class meetings would be supplemented by lectures and performances of visiting artists to PNCA, as well as by trips off-campus to exhibitions and performances locally and beyond.

PRM551 - Collaboration & Research Lab, 3 credits
This four semester course provides an experimental laboratory experience supporting research, collaboration and creativity. Students will collaborate on projects as both experiments and professional practice. They will be required to search out a topic of research for each semester, which could continue through all four semesters. Research logs and presentations will be conducted in the lab and presented to the community. This course allows the student to use the scientific process as an alternative form of making as they take a more independent and creative line of inquiry in other courses.

PRM552 - Collaboration & Research Lab, 3 credits
This four semester course provides an experimental laboratory experience supporting research, collaboration and creativity. Students will collaborate on projects as both experiments and professional practice. They will be required to search out a topic of research for each semester, which could continue through all four semesters. Research logs and presentations will be conducted in the lab and presented to the community. This course allows the student to use the scientific process as an alternative form of making as they take a more independent and creative line of inquiry in other courses.

PRM561 - Critical Studies: Pedagogy, 3 credits
This is a MFA course addressing pedagogical strategies in post-secondary arts education. Through readings, students will be introduced to various philosophies of education from arts educators and philosophers from around the globe and will critically discuss these ideas in class. By the end of the course, students will develop their own written teaching philosophy, a sample syllabus for a Foundation class at PNCA, as well as a sample syllabus for a class of their choice, and will teach one topic from this course. Lectures and guests will augment discussion of professional practice issues surrounding arts education and what is involved in successfully applying for teaching positions. MFA students enrolled in this course will simultaneously act as a student teacher to a PNCA faculty member and will maintain a weekly log of their experience as a student teacher.

PRM562 CS:Contemporary Print Media Seminar, 3 credits
This seminar will immerse students in the world of contemporary printmaking by looking at the prominent producers and disseminators of print media. With the definition of "what is a print?" rapidly expanding, students will contextualize works by identifying and analyzing trends and influences. Innovations in media, including digital interfaces and 3D fabrication, will be examined for how they shape the meaning, appearance, display, and audience for fine prints, which have come to include objects, installations, video and other time-based art. Lectures, readings, and discussions will take up the critical theory and aesthetics of contemporary print practices, addressing questions such as the place of craft and process, the idea of originality and authenticity, the role of collaboration and community in professional print workshops, the relation of image and text, and the intersection of fine art and graphic design, commercialism, industry, technology, and society. The course will be complemented by museum and gallery tours and visits from guest speakers. Students will contribute oral presentations and complete a final research essay.

PRM571 Print Media Internship, 3 credits
Print Media Internship requires approval of the Dept. Chair in Print Media.

PRM601 - Print Media Graduate Studio, 3 credits
Graduate Studio, the foundation of the 60-credit, two-year MFA in Print Media program, students take an individualized approach to their education, synthesizing their diverse experiences into their work. Students work in private studios within a shared community environment, where cross-disciplinary exchange is highly encouraged. Studio practice is guided by faculty mentors who meet with students weekly to provide critique, dialogue, and occasional assignments geared toward the individual student’s creative investigations. Graduate Studio culminates in an exhibition of work and a written thesis presented at the end of the second year. In addition to working with faculty mentors, students meet for group critiques and on-campus activities.

PRM602 - Capstone Project with Mentor, 6 credits
This credit bearing studio assignment allows graduate students to explore, experiment and apply their creative practice in either an independent or collaborative process. This assignment will continue through all four semesters of the program. Every semester, students will be assessed by their chair, program faculty, invited guests and peers as they develop a body of work.

In the final semester, students will be linked with a mentor to focus on a capstone project. The capstone project will also be evaluated by the chair, program faculty and invited guests. Students will be required to give an oral presentation and defend their outcomes. This capstone process is linked to a thesis paper, which is developed in the Capstone Research + Writing Course.

PRM625 - Graduate Critique Seminar, 3 credits
Taken all four semesters by all students in the Print Media program, the Graduate Critique Seminar provides candidates with an intellectual community and critical forum in which they may test, temper, and enlarge the ideas that underlie their artistic goals. The Seminar will meet weekly to critique, in rotation, the work-in-progress of all candidates. The cross-disciplinary nature of the conversation is meant to foster the widest possible dialogue among artists, encourage divergent thinking and discourage the easy acceptance of received notions. The seminar will also include lectures, critiques, and discussions with Visiting Artists/Scholars/Critics. The Seminar is led by one of the MFA in Print Media faculty, who may also enlist other faculty members, as well as visiting artists, critics and scholars, to join discussions and critiques. Students may also be assigned critical readings to prepare for presentation and discussion, and class meetings would be supplemented by lectures and performances of visiting artists to PNCA, as well as by trips off-campus to exhibitions and performances locally and beyond.

PRM626 - Graduate Critique Seminar, 3 credits
Taken all four semesters by all students in the Print Media program, the Graduate Critique Seminar provides candidates with an intellectual community and critical forum in which they may test, temper, and enlarge the ideas that underlie their artistic goals. The Seminar will meet weekly to critique, in rotation, the work-in-progress of all candidates. The cross-disciplinary nature of the conversation is meant to foster the widest possible dialogue among artists, encourage divergent thinking and discourage the easy acceptance of received notions. The seminar will also include lectures, critiques, and discussions with Visiting Artists/Scholars/Critics. The Seminar is led by one of the MFA in Print Media faculty, who may also enlist other faculty members, as well as visiting artists, critics and scholars, to join discussions and critiques. Students may also be assigned critical readings to prepare for presentation and discussion, and class meetings would be supplemented by lectures and performances of visiting artists to PNCA, as well as by trips off-campus to exhibitions and performances locally and beyond.

PRM651 - Collaboration & Research Lab, 3 credits
This four semester course provides an experimental laboratory experience supporting research, collaboration and creativity. Students will collaborate on projects as both experiments and professional practice. They will be required to search out a topic of research for each semester, which could continue through all four semesters. Research logs and presentations will be conducted in the lab and presented to the community. This course allows the student to use the scientific process as an alternative form of making as they take a more independent and creative line of inquiry in other courses.

PRM652 - Collaboration & Research Lab, 3 credits
This four semester course provides an experimental laboratory experience supporting research, collaboration and creativity. Students will collaborate on projects as both experiments and professional practice. They will be required to search out a topic of research for each semester, which could continue through all four semesters. Research logs and presentations will be conducted in the lab and presented to the community. This course allows the student to use the scientific process as an alternative form of making as they take a more independent and creative line of inquiry in other courses.

PRM661 - Critical Studies: Multiples, 3 credits
This course examines ""multiples"" in historical and contemporary contexts in order to develop criteria for understanding and strategies for reconfiguring the concept. Our exploration will include examples from craft, design, art, media, and technology and the intersections and exchanges between these interrelated fields. Throughout, we will be interested in exploring relations between making and thinking, hand and mind, human and machine, objects and systems, materiality and abstraction and the ramifications of the pairs' interactions for perception, sensibility and intelligence. The course will also address issues relevant to the course material raised by and related to the MFA lectures and invited guests. In addition to preparing weekly readings, students will engage in a semester-long research project and present their findings in both written formats and oral presentations.

PRM662 - Critical Studies: Capstone Research & Writing, 3 credits
This course is designed to instruct, guide, and support Print Media students with the completion of a Thesis Paper. The Thesis Paper is a statement of your critical positions as an artist and/or collaborator. It is informed by your creative practice and supported by relevant sources. This course prepares students to develop a successfully researched paper that relates the concept, process, and evaluation of their capstone project. At the end of this course, the student should be prepared to present a thoroughly developed Thesis Paper, Oral Presentation, and defense of their Capstone Project. Each student will be led through rough drafts before the final paper is presented for grading, binding, and storage in the PNCA library holdings.

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MFA in Visual Studies

VS501 - Graduate Studio, 9 credits
Graduate Studio, the foundation of the 60-credit, two-year MFA in VS program, students take an individualized approach to their education, synthesizing their diverse experiences into their work. Students work in private studios within a shared community environment, where cross-disciplinary exchange is highly encouraged. Studio practice is guided by faculty mentors who meet with students weekly to provide critique, dialogue, and occasional assignments geared toward the individual student's creative investigations. Graduate Studio culminates in an exhibition of work and a written thesis presented at the end of the second year. In addition to working with faculty mentors, students meet for group critiques and on-campus activities.

VS502 - Graduate Studio, 9 credits
Graduate Studio, the foundation of the 60-credit, two-year MFA in VS program, students take an individualized approach to their education, synthesizing their diverse experiences into their work. Students work in private studios within a shared community environment, where cross-disciplinary exchange is highly encouraged. Studio practice is guided by faculty mentors who meet with students weekly to provide critique, dialogue, and occasional assignments geared toward the individual student's creative investigations. Graduate Studio culminates in an exhibition of work and a written thesis presented at the end of the second year. In addition to working with faculty mentors, students meet for group critiques and on-campus activities.

VS525 - Graduate Critique Seminar, 3 credits
Taken all four semesters by all students in the MFA program, the Graduate Critique Seminar provides candidates with an intellectual community and critical forum in which they may test, temper, and enlarge the ideas that underlie their artistic goals. The Seminar will meet weekly to critique, in rotation, the work-in-progress of all candidates. The cross-disciplinary nature of the conversation is meant to foster the widest possible dialogue among artists, encourage divergent thinking and discourage the easy acceptance of received notions. The seminar will also include, critiques, and discussions with Visiting Artists/Scholars/Critics. The Seminar is led by MFA faculty members, as well as visiting artists, critics and scholars, who join in on discussions and critiques. Students may also be assigned critical readings to prepare for presentation and discussion, and class meetings are supplemented by lectures and performances of visiting artists to PNCA through the MFAVS visiting artist series.

VS526 - Graduate Critique Seminar, 3 credits
Taken all four semesters by all students in the MFA program, the Graduate Critique Seminar provides candidates with an intellectual community and critical forum in which they may test, temper, and enlarge the ideas that underlie their artistic goals. The Seminar will meet weekly to critique, in rotation, the work-in-progress of all candidates. The cross-disciplinary nature of the conversation is meant to foster the widest possible dialogue among artists, encourage divergent thinking and discourage the easy acceptance of received notions. The seminar will also include, critiques, and discussions with Visiting Artists/Scholars/Critics. The Seminar is led by MFA faculty members, as well as visiting artists, critics and scholars, who join in on discussions and critiques. Students may also be assigned critical readings to prepare for presentation and discussion, and class meetings are supplemented by lectures and performances of visiting artists to PNCA through the MFAVS visiting artist series.

VS633 - VS Independent Study, 3 credits
Visual Studies Independent Study requires approval of the Dept. Chair in MFA Visual Studies with Independent Study Form available in the Academic Affairs office.

VS551 - Contemporary Art and Design Seminar, 3 credits
This is a graduate level one-semester course that exposes students to contemporary art making strategies, artists, curators, critics, histories and systems that influence and drive the expansion of the current art world. This is an image-based course in which art and theory are approached in an interconnected fashion, with an emphasis on the flow and interchange of significant ideas between the visual and the textual — art in dialogue with theory and history. Topics will be explored through: slide lectures, museum and gallery visits, videos and web sites, as well as reading discussion of selected books, articles and essays. Students engage in research methodology as part of the oral presentation and writing component of the class, providing an opportunity to share research. In order to reflect a variety of viewpoints and disciplines, guests are invited to speak on a broad range of contemporary art and theoretical concerns. Over the course of the semester, a series of related issues are addressed in conjunction with invited guests and MFA lectures whose work is relevant to the subject under discussion.

VS552 - Contemporary Theory Seminar, 3 credits
This seminar explores critical theory as a critique of seeing, images, art, the construction of “otherness” (sexism, racism, classism, heterosexism, nationalism, etc.), and the roles and responsibilities of artists and viewers. Questions about theory and practice will be grounded in examples of the work of artists. The seminar begins and ends with questions. When images can be used both to save and to kill, what does it mean to be an artist? Drawing on critical theory, performance theory, rhetorical analysis, and ethics, we will attend to the responsibilities of image-makers and image consumers; the roles of artists in an image-saturated culture; the (mis)use of images to construct difference; and questions about how human beings engage language and images to make worlds. Topics to be covered include: visuality, panopticism, performativity, ideology, experience, racism, whiteness, phenomenology, postcolonialism, sexism, queerness, resistance, agency, language, grievability, mystery, and (in)visibility.

VS555 - Critical Pedagogy (offered both Fall Semester and Spring Semester), 3 credits
This is a graduate level course addressing pedagogical strategies in post-secondary arts education. Students will be introduced through readings to various philosophies of education from arts educators and philosophers from around the globe and will critically discuss these ideas in class. By the end of the course students will develop their own written teaching philosophy, a sample syllabus of a class of their choice, a cover letter and a teaching CV. Lectures and invited guests will augment discussion of professional practice issues surrounding arts education and what is involved in successfully applying for teaching positions. MFA students enrolled in this course will simultaneously act as a student teacher to one of the PNCA faculty and will maintain a weekly log of their experience in the class.

VS601 - Graduate Studio, 9 credits
Graduate Studio, the foundation of the 60-credit, two-year MFA in VS program, students take an individualized approach to their education, synthesizing their diverse experiences into their work. Students work in private studios within a shared community environment, where cross-disciplinary exchange is highly encouraged. Studio practice is guided by faculty mentors who meet with students weekly to provide critique, dialogue, and occasional assignments geared toward the individual student's creative investigations. Graduate Studio culminates in an exhibition of work and a written thesis presented at the end of the second year. In addition to working with faculty mentors, students meet for group critiques and on-campus activities.

VS602 - Graduate Studio, 6 credits
Graduate Studio, the foundation of the 60-credit, two-year MFA in VS program, students take an individualized approach to their education, synthesizing their diverse experiences into their work. Students work in private studios within a shared community environment, where cross-disciplinary exchange is highly encouraged. Studio practice is guided by faculty mentors who meet with students weekly to provide critique, dialogue, and occasional assignments geared toward the individual student's creative investigations. Graduate Studio culminates in an exhibition of work and a written thesis presented at the end of the second year. In addition to working with faculty mentors, students meet for group critiques and on-campus activities.

VS625 - Graduate Critique Seminar, 3 credits
Taken all four semesters by all students in the MFA program, the Graduate Critique Seminar provides candidates with an intellectual community and critical forum in which they may test, temper, and enlarge the ideas that underlie their artistic goals. The Seminar will meet weekly to critique, in rotation, the work-in-progress of all candidates. The cross-disciplinary nature of the conversation is meant to foster the widest possible dialogue among artists, encourage divergent thinking and discourage the easy acceptance of received notions. The seminar will also include, critiques, and discussions with Visiting Artists/Scholars/Critics. The Seminar is led by MFA faculty members, as well as visiting artists, critics and scholars, who join in on discussions and critiques. Students may also be assigned critical readings to prepare for presentation and discussion, and class meetings are supplemented by lectures and performances of visiting artists to PNCA through the MFAVS visiting artist series.

VS626 - Graduate Critique Seminar, 3 credits
Taken all four semesters by all students in the MFA program, the Graduate Critique Seminar provides candidates with an intellectual community and critical forum in which they may test, temper, and enlarge the ideas that underlie their artistic goals. The Seminar will meet weekly to critique, in rotation, the work-in-progress of all candidates. The cross-disciplinary nature of the conversation is meant to foster the widest possible dialogue among artists, encourage divergent thinking and discourage the easy acceptance of received notions. The seminar will also include, critiques, and discussions with Visiting Artists/Scholars/Critics. The Seminar is led by MFA faculty members, as well as visiting artists, critics and scholars, who join in on discussions and critiques. Students may also be assigned critical readings to prepare for presentation and discussion, and class meetings are supplemented by lectures and performances of visiting artists to PNCA through the MFAVS visiting artist series.

VS672 Graduate Thesis Writing, 3 credits
This course is designed to instruct, guide, and support the MFA student with the completion of her/his Thesis Paper. The Thesis Paper is a statement of your critical positions as an artist. It is informed by your studio practice and supported by relevant sources. This course prepares the MFA student to develop a successfully researched Thesis Paper that relates the concept, process, and evaluation of their artwork to a reader. At the end of this course, the student should be prepared to present a thoroughly developed Thesis Paper. Each student will be led through three rough drafts before the final paper is presented for grading, binding, and storage in the PNCA library holdings. The final body of text will be between 6000 and 9000 words (approximately 20-30 pages) in length.

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Low-Residency MFA in Visual Studies

VSLR501 - Graduate Studio, 4.5 credits
Summer Onsite Graduate Studio, the foundation of the 60-credit, MFA in VS (low-res) program, students take an individualized approach to their education, synthesizing their diverse experiences into their work. Students work in private studios within a shared community environment, where cross-disciplinary exchange is highly encouraged. Studio practice is guided by faculty mentors who meet with students weekly to provide critique, dialogue, and occasional assignments geared toward the individual student's creative investigations. Graduate Studio culminates in an exhibition of work and a written thesis presented at the end of their final summer. In addition to working with faculty mentors, students meet for group critiques and on-campus activities.

VSLR502, VSLR503 Graduate Studio, 3 credits
Fall Offsite / Spring Offsite Graduate Studio, the foundation of the 60-credit, MFA in VS (low-res) program, students take an individualized approach to their education, synthesizing their diverse experiences into their work. Students work in private studios within a shared community environment, where cross-disciplinary exchange is highly encouraged. Studio practice is guided by faculty mentors who meet with students weekly to provide critique, dialogue, and occasional assignments geared toward the individual student's creative investigations. Graduate Studio culminates in an exhibition of work and a written thesis presented at the end of their final summer. In addition to working with faculty mentors, students meet for group critiques and on-campus activities.

VSLR512 - Winter Studio Review, 1.5 credits
During five days in January, students meet on campus for Winter reviews during which they receive feedback on work produced during the Fall and engage in intensive seminars and short workshops.

VSLR525 - Graduate Critique Seminar, 3 credits
The goal of this course is to provide candidates with an intellectual community and critical forum in which they may test, temper, and enlarge the ideas that underlie their artistic goals. The Seminar will meet regularly to critique, in rotation, the work of all candidates. The cross-disciplinary nature of the conversation is meant to foster the widest possible dialogue among artists, encourage divergent thinking and discourage the easy acceptance of received notions. MFA students will participate with regional, national and international visiting artists, designers, critics, scholars, curators and others, in student critiques and discussions. Professional practice is embedded in these seminars. Faculty leading this course may also enlist other faculty members, as well as visiting artists, critics and scholars, to join discussions and critiques. Students may also be assigned critical readings to prepare for presentation and discussion. Visiting artists may engage students through demonstrations as well as by trips off-campus to exhibitions and performances locally and beyond.

VSLR531 - VSLR Independent Study, 3 credits
Dept. Chair approval required.

VSLR532 - Visiting Artist Lecture Series, 1.5 credits
Each week during the intensive a Visiting Artist or Scholar is hosted by the program introducing MFA students to the breadth of contemporary artistic, scholarly, philosophical and cultural voices. Each summer the Low-Residency MFA also hosts an Artist-in-Residence who works for an extended period within the program. Visiting Artists, Scholars, and Artists-in-Residence are selected specifically in response to the MFA students within the program and their areas of inquiry.

VSLR534 - Library Research Seminar, 1.5 credits
Structured to take place during the first year winter review session, the Library Research Seminar provides both an orientation to library resources and critical independent research skills for students who will be at distance between summer intensives. The seminar provides tools and instruction for using online digital resources and access to journals, periodicals and texts. A short research paper on a topic of interest is used to showcase best practices and initiate the assessment of a student's writing.

VSLR551 - Contemporary Art Seminar, 3 credits
This is an upper division one-semester course that exposes students to contemporary art histories, strategies, artists, curators, critics, and systems that influence and drive the expansion of the current art world. Art, criticism and theory are approached in an interconnected fashion, with an emphasis on the flow and interchange of significant ideas between the visual and the textual — art in dialogue with theory and history. Topics will be explored through slide lectures, gallery visits, videos, web sites and reading discussion of selected books, articles and essays. Students will engage in research methodologies within the written and oral presentation components of this course, with the final oral presentation providing the opportunity to share research with the class. In order to reflect a variety of viewpoints and disciplines, guest artists and lecturers relevant to topics under discussion will be invited to speak with the class.

VSLR601 - Graduate Studio, 4.5 credits
Summer Onsite Graduate Studio, the foundation of the 60-credit, MFA in VS (low-res) program, students take an individualized approach to their education, synthesizing their diverse experiences into their work. Students work in private studios within a shared community environment, where cross-disciplinary exchange is highly encouraged. Studio practice is guided by faculty mentors who meet with students weekly to provide critique, dialogue, and occasional assignments geared toward the individual student's creative investigations. Graduate Studio culminates in an exhibition of work and a written thesis presented at the end of their final summer. In addition to working with faculty mentors, students meet for group critiques and on-campus activities.

VSLR602 VSLR603 - Graduate Studio, 3 credits
Fall Offsite / Spring Offsite Graduate Studio, the foundation of the 60-credit, MFA in VS (low-res) program, students take an individualized approach to their education, synthesizing their diverse experiences into their work. Students work in private studios within a shared community environment, where cross-disciplinary exchange is highly encouraged. Studio practice is guided by faculty mentors who meet with students weekly to provide critique, dialogue, and occasional assignments geared toward the individual student's creative investigations. Graduate Studio culminates in an exhibition of work and a written thesis presented at the end of their final summer. In addition to working with faculty mentors, students meet for group critiques and on-campus activities.

VSLR604 - Graduate Studio, 6 credits
Summer Onsite Graduate Studio, the foundation of the 60-credit, MFA in VS (low-res) program, students take an individualized approach to their education, synthesizing their diverse experiences into their work. Students work in private studios within a shared community environment, where cross-disciplinary exchange is highly encouraged. Studio practice is guided by faculty mentors who meet with students weekly to provide critique, dialogue, and occasional assignments geared toward the individual student's creative investigations. Graduate Studio culminates in an exhibition of work and a written thesis presented at the end of their final summer. In addition to working with faculty mentors, students meet for group critiques and on-campus activities.

VSLR612 - Winter Studio Review, 1.5 credits
During five days in January, students meet on campus for Winter reviews during which they receive feedback on work produced during the Fall and engage in intensive seminars and short workshops.

VSLR625 - Graduate Critique Seminar, 3 credits
The goal of this course is to provide candidates with an intellectual community and critical forum in which they may test, temper, and enlarge the ideas that underlie their artistic goals. The Seminar will meet regularly to critique, in rotation, the work of all candidates. The cross-disciplinary nature of the conversation is meant to foster the widest possible dialogue among artists, encourage divergent thinking and discourage the easy acceptance of received notions. MFA students will participate with regional, national and international visiting artists, designers, critics, scholars, curators and others, in student critiques and discussions. Professional practice is embedded in these seminars. Faculty leading this course may also enlist other faculty members, as well as visiting artists, critics and scholars, to join discussions and critiques. Students may also be assigned critical readings to prepare for presentation and discussion. Visiting artists may engage students through demonstrations as well as by trips off-campus to exhibitions and performances locally and beyond.

VSLR626 - Graduate Critique Seminar, 3 credits
The goal of this course is to provide candidates with an intellectual community and critical forum in which they may test, temper, and enlarge the ideas that underlie their artistic goals. The Seminar will meet regularly to critique, in rotation, the work of all candidates. The cross-disciplinary nature of the conversation is meant to foster the widest possible dialogue among artists, encourage divergent thinking and discourage the easy acceptance of received notions. MFA students will participate with regional, national and international visiting artists, designers, critics, scholars, curators and others, in student critiques and discussions. Professional practice is embedded in these seminars. Faculty leading this course may also enlist other faculty members, as well as visiting artists, critics and scholars, to join discussions and critiques. Students may also be assigned critical readings to prepare for presentation and discussion. Visiting artists may engage students through demonstrations as well as by trips off-campus to exhibitions and performances locally and beyond.

VSLR631 - VSLR Independent Study, 3 credits
Dept. Chair approval required.

VSLR632 - Visiting Artist Lecture Series, 1.5 credits
Each week during the intensive a Visiting Artist or Scholar is hosted by the program introducing MFA students to the breadth of contemporary artistic, scholarly, philosophical and cultural voices. Each summer the Low-Residency MFA also hosts an Artist-in-Residence who works for an extended period within the program. Visiting Artists, Scholars, and Artists-in-Residence are selected specifically in response to the MFA students within the program and their areas of inquiry.

VSLR634 - Professional Practice, 1.5 credits
This course is designed to develop effective professional strategies for successfully pursuing and navigating a sustained and meaningful artistic practice upon completion of the MFA LRVS program; taking into consideration the multitude of disciplines, interests and goals the program supports. We will consider protocols for professional etiquette, identify opportunities for achieving career objectives, and examine personal and social identities that comprise an individual's professional identity. Emphasis is placed on developing strong self-presentation skills to best represent your individual practice. This may include: portfolio development, submission materials, grant and exhibition proposals, working with galleries, residencies, fellowships, teaching positions, interviewing, public lectures, job search resources, calls for entry, taxes, websites, shipping, contracts, commissions, and establishing a studio. The objective is to prepare students to identify, plan and pursue strategies for successful career development and professional accomplishments from which to offer a meaningful cultural contribution.

VSLR652 - Critical Studies/Visual Media Seminar, 3 credits
This seminar explores critical theory as a critique of seeing, images, art, the construction of "otherness" (gender, race, class, sexuality, nation), and the roles and responsibilities of artists and viewers. Though our subject is theory, questions about theory and practice will be grounded in examples of the work of artists. Our seminar begins and ends with questions. When images can be used both to save and to kill, what does it mean to be an artist? Drawing on critical theory, performance theory, rhetorical analysis, and ethics, we will attend to the responsibilities of imagemakers and image consumers; the roles of artists in an image-saturated culture; the (mis)use of images to construct difference; and questions about how human beings engage language and images to make worlds. Topics to be covered include: visuality, panopticism, performativity, ideology, experience, racism, whiteness, phenomenology, postcolonialism, sexism, resistance, agency, language, grievability, mystery, and (in)visibility.

VSLR672 - Graduate Thesis Writing, 3 credits
This course is designed to instruct, guide, and support the MFA student with the completion of her/his Thesis Paper. The Thesis Paper is a statement of your critical positions as an artist. It is informed by your studio practice and supported by relevant sources. This course prepares the MFA student to develop a successfully researched Thesis Paper that relates the concept, process, and evaluation of their artwork to a reader. At the end of this course, the student should be prepared to present a thoroughly developed Thesis Paper. Each student will be led through three rough drafts before the final paper is presented for grading, binding, and storage in the PNCA library holdings. The final body of text will be between 6000 and 9000 words (approximately 20-30 pages) in length.