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First Year: Foundation and Liberal Arts

FD100 - First Year Seminar, 1 credit
This course is designed to help first year students make a successful transition to PNCA. Through presentations, hands-on projects, discussions, and field trips, students will develop the skills and habits to be successful in a new social and academic setting. Strong emphasis will be placed on building community and connecting students to resources that can enhance their studies and creative practices.

FD101 - Visual Elements: 2D, 3 credits
This semester long course introduces students to the basic elements and principles of 2D design and color theory with an emphasis on compositional strategies and creative and conceptual thinking. Students will develop a stronger visual language for communicating their ideas through problem solving, materials exploration, and critical discussion. This course allows students to develop organizational control in visual structures, and to improve their ability to manage complex design problems in a variety of disciplines.

FD102 - Visual Elements: Digital Tools, 3 credits
This semester long course introduces students to the fundamentals of digital imaging as a tool for design. Students develop the use of line, shape, value, mass, texture and pattern and learn to apply this knowledge to achieve certain effects: harmony, contrast, balance, symmetry, rhythm, movement, perspective and space illusion. These concepts will be explored through the three basic types of applications used in contemporary digital design: vector programs, raster (bitmapped) programs and to a lesser extent, page layout programs.

FD105 - Basic Drawing, 3 credits
This semester long course focuses on the fundamental components of drawing. It will explore the use of line and value to create and manipulate form, volume, composition and space on paper. The underlying formal principles of drawing will be closely examined, and numerous mark making techniques employed. The structure of the course will guide the student through a process of seeing, investigating, and realizing the visible world on a two-dimensional surface. This course will also build on observational drawing skills through projects with expanded parameters. Issues and ideas that inform and influence the function of drawing and the decision-making process will also be discussed.

FD111 - 3-D Design, 3 credits
Three-dimensional design is a broad discipline and can be thought of in terms of sculpture, industrial design, architecture and the creation of any space. This course introduces the fundamentals of three-dimensional design techniques and concepts such as space, mass, form, volume, texture, material, and structure. Spatial problems are investigated through a variety of traditional and non-traditional materials and methods to develop skills, as well as contexts for their expression.

FD112 - Time Arts, 3 credits
Time Arts introduces the concepts and practical study of space, sound and time as they relate to both sequential and non-sequential narration, movement, timing and interactivity. Students will work both individually and collaboratively to explore these concepts through a variety of media including video, sound, performance, books (flipbooks, comic books, artist books), and other narrative and non-narrative structures.

LA122 - Writing in Context, 3 credits
This course provides a writing-based introduction to a particular field of study in the liberal arts, ranging from literature to political thought and from film to environmental studies. It is a reading-intensive course taught by Liberal Arts faculty of many disciplines, and draws on both the expertise of the instructor and a broad sampling of texts relevant to the course topic. Foundation Writing and Writing in Context classes introduce students to various approaches to textual interpretation, critical thinking, and writing. In both semesters, the instructors model and teach students how to use citations, appropriate and employ quotations, summarize text, and to build relevant bibliographies. Students learn to read critically, to discuss the material with classmates and with the instructor, to conduct relevant and documented research, and to shape and present informed ideas in a variety of writing formats that demonstrate clarity, coherence, intellectual force, and stylistic control.

LA125 - Exploring Visual Culture, 3 credits
This introductory course explores the relationship between art, design, and our current global culture. We will look at varied examples of contemporary art and design in order to better understand the theories, methods, trends, and histories that shape the production and reception of art and design today. This course will generate ideas and vocabulary that will facilitate your ability to discuss your work and the work of others. It will foster an understanding of how your creative work fits into a larger social, historical, and cultural context.

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Animated Arts

AA231 - Beginning Animated Arts, 3 credits
The first of a two-semester sequence, this studio course will explore the relationship of sound and moving image from the frame-by-frame perspective of fine art animation. Students with diverse interests within and across, painting and drawing, sculpture, illustration, music, and performance will obtain a basic formal and conceptual knowledge of animation principles, cinematic vocabulary and experimental structures. Animation is investigated through projects, lecture/screenings on historical and contemporary works and ideas, discussion of readings, visiting artists, research and writing, hands-on experiences, and collaborative projects. In the first semester students will experiment with a variety of production methods and materials using LunchBox Sync and iStop Motion for capturing. Students will be encouraged to explore a range of alternative approaches to creating the illusion of movement as well as to see animation as a nuanced medium for self-expression across various media platforms that communicate within and outside the traditional movie house. Prerequisites: All Foundation studio courses.

AA232 - Beginning Animated Arts II, 3 credits
The second of a two-semester sequence, this studio course expands on the frame-by-frame perspective and hybrid moving image making skills using digital software. Students with diverse interests within and across, painting and drawing, sculpture, illustration, music, and performance will obtain a basic formal and conceptual knowledge of animation principles, cinematic vocabulary and experimental structures. Animation is investigated through projects, lecture/screenings on historical and contemporary works and ideas, discussion of readings, visiting artists, research and writing, hands-on experiences, and collaborative projects. In the second semester students will apply principles of timing and pacing as they learn composite software: After Effects, Flash and Painter. Students will be encouraged to explore a range of alternative approaches to creating the illusion of movement as well as to see animation as a nuanced medium for self-expression across various media platforms that communicate within and outside the traditional movie house. Prerequisites: AA231.

AA235 - Animated Arts Special Topics, 3 credits
Special topics courses are approved to take advantage of timely subjects, the expertise of a faculty member, or to test student interest in a topic which may later be added to the curriculum. Prerequisites: AA231-232.

AA236 - Character and Identity, 3 credits
Character Design has its roots in industry animation where a fixed set of shapes allowed studios to employ any number of animators to work simultaneously. Character & Identity assumes audiences can relate to and engage with a character without the maker having to dilute or amplify to arrive at a superficial representation of a type. The course seeks to contrast the usual reductive approaches in thinking about “character” by investigating the pitfalls of classifying and stereotyping. With a starting focus on media literacy as a disruption to the usual introduction of “character,” students will engage in a variety of research methods aimed at gathering specifics rather than generalizations to inform visual development. How can one use the typical character types as a departure point rather than a destination? How are the traditional ways of categorizing and developing character effective and in what ways do they fail to reflect the fluidity and complexity of humanity? With the goal of designing original characters, students will collect and assemble a personal visual reference library to support their findings and challenge their own preconceptions. Students will do field work where they would go out and actively study and document real people as a way of researching when developing their designs that seek out and celebrate specifics rather than generalizations. Students will conduct interviews with people and look for all the subtleties in selfpresentation, dress, cadences of speech and physical vocabulary as well as consider how people move in different spaces, bodies, and states of mind. Acting or improv segments and drawing from life will hone observational skills. Students will assemble a personal visual reference library to support their findings and challenge their own preconceptions. Prerequisites: Studio Foundation.

AA237 - Stop Motion, 3 credits
This course builds upon basic animation principles with a focus on the puppet/object as a character. Open to any student who completes the pre-requisite of Beginning Animated Arts I, this course introduces the camera and lighting and applies principles of animated motion to 3D objects and puppets utilizing various materials from paper cut-outs to ball & socket armatures. The practice and craft of Stop Motion animation is investigated through lecture-demonstrations, screenings of historical and contemporary works, visiting artists and industry professionals, and guided technical sessions in our stop motion suites. Throughout students will be encouraged to use animated movement: timing, pacing, and gesture to communicate a range of nuanced expressions that create visual narrative. The course culminates in an individual final project suitable for portfolio and reel. Prerequisite: Beginning Animated Arts I.

AA331 - Animated Short Film, 3 credits
Animated Short Film. This upper division hybrid media studio extends the principles of animation – the pacing of sequential images, the tension between stillness and movement, and the hybrid compositing practices that define digital filmmaking – in the creation of innovative, upper division work constructed from a frame-by-frame perspective. Animated Short Film - Topics include: digital film and hybrid moving image, gestures and languages of movement, rotoscoping and the loss of the index, and the architecture of animated space. The course is structured by individual and collaborative projects, critiques, lectures and screenings on historical and contemporary animated art forms, discussions of theoretical readings, research and writing, and field work to support in-depth investigations tied to non-traditional contexts, interdisciplinary investigations and a range of display platforms. Prerequisites: AA231

AA332 - Animated Installation, 3 credits
This upper division studio course builds upon the principles of animation – while pushing the idea of ‘screen’ beyond the traditional single rectangular experience. Course topics address both concepts and production to include: experiencing spatial form/moving image in spaces, spectacle & poetics, and considerations for multi-channel projections. The course includes individual and collaborative projects, equipment demonstrations and hands-on technical experimenting, critiques, field trips, and lectures/screenings on historical and contemporary installations and projections. Students will be asked to participate and lead discussions of theoretical readings and engage in upper division practice-based research to support in-depth investigations leading to the creation of work designed for range of display platforms and audiences. Final projects will culminate in a public exhibition. Prerequisites: AA231.

AA333 - Narrative Strategies, 3 credits
This upper division course will investigate narrative construction, both implied and explicit, through the frame of literature, film and critical theory with a focus on understanding and developing animated narratives for short form platforms. Through applied exercises, lecture/screenings, critiques and discussions of readings, participants will explore how the particular language of animation can be used to create original and challenging work in single and multiple channels. Projects will address associative thinking, visualization, narrative events, event analysis, and structural processes with direct reference to traditional narrative forms, documentary and experimental practice. Through collaborative, provocative, and spirited investigations of a variety of historical and contemporary approaches, students will engage in advanced critical thinking as a means to investigate narrative structures and creative practice within moving image arts. Prerequisites: AA231-232.

AA335 - Animated Arts Special Topics, 3 credits
Special topics courses are approved to take advantage of timely subjects, the expertise of a faculty member, or to test student interest in a topic which may later be added to the curriculum. Prerequisites: AA231-232.

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Graphic Design

DA151 - Design Arts Freshman Elective, 3 credits
In Design Arts Foundation Studio students are introduced to the processes of illustration and graphic design. While both disciplines have distinct characteristics and functions, they are closely linked historically and in contemporary creative practice. This course offers students a strong technical and conceptual framework for a major in Graphic Design or Illustration. In weekly experimental studio sessions, students will explore various principles and methodologies from graphic design and illustration, exploring their intersections in contemporary client-based practice. Through incorporation of drawing, typography, painting, collage, and digital media, students will encounter new creative possibilities and find exposure to the dynamic opportunities available to the contemporary illustrator and designer.

CD241 - Design Studio I: Signs, 3 credits
This course introduces the student to the structure of visual languages and how these structures are used consciously and unconsciously in design. The course begins by exploring modes of signification and the ideological roles of media in contemporary culture. Key strands in critical theory such as mythology and ideology will be introduced. Students will examine the transmission of meaning in our visual culture. In particular, students will be asked to judge for themselves the truth of old certainties relating to the techniques and the very purposes of graphic design. Computer skills and compositional skills will be stressed and enhanced. Prerequisites: All Foundation studio courses.

CD242 - Design Studio I: Psychology of Seeing, 3 credits
This course focuses on the roles that human perception and cognition play in the world of design. As such this studio course examines the notion of locating the individual in the sphere of cultural production and consumption. The aim of the course is to discover how notions of the unconscious affect the decision-making patterns of consumers in our visual culture. Students are introduced to various psychological principles that facilitate our understanding of how humans are motivated to action or behavior in design and advertising. Technically, the course will rely heavily on page layout, color response, and typography. Prerequisites: All Foundation studio courses.

CD245 - Typography I, 3 credits
Typographic skills and concepts are applied to situations involving the use of type in layout, illustration, and time-based applications. The emphasis is not only on style and composition, but also on formal and semantic issues as these are influenced by project function and technological criteria. Students will be able to understand the history and evolution of typography, and to discuss and analyze the physical aspects and nuances of type and typographic measurements. Some key concepts in type design will be explored as well. Projects will explore a variety of solutions to design problems that require both expressiveness as well as an understanding of the practical uses of type in graphic design. Prerequisites: All Foundation studio courses.

CD246 - Typography II, 3 credits
Typography II is a continuation of systems and ideas explored initially in Typography I. This course includes historical and contemporary lectures mixed with studio time for experimentation, research, and personal application of concepts. This course is intended to give you a further understanding and appreciation of type as a tool for the designer. During this course, typographic skills and concepts are applied to situations involving the use of type in digital and manual applications. Prerequisites: CD241 and CD245.

CD247 - Production, 3 credits
This course provides an understanding of the scope and correlation of design, pre-press preparation and the production process. Fundamentals of computer hardware/software management and the importance of time management and project planning will be stressed. Prerequisites: All Foundation studio courses.

CD251 - Fundamentals of Interactive Media, 3 credits
Fundamentals of Interactive Media is first in the series of two interactive design courses, is offered in the Spring semester, and is required for GD students. This course serves as an introduction to interactive design with user experience and user interface methodologies. Basic principles of design for digital platforms are discussed, as well as interaction design concepts such as app/web, augmented and virtual reality, ocular/voice recognition, environmental/experience design, etc. Students will develop the background needed to understand how audio, video, animation and motion graphics affect user interaction and experience within digital media. Prerequisites: All Foundation studio courses.

CD310 - Graphic Design Special Topics, 3 credits
Special topics courses are approved to take advantage of timely subjects, the expertise of a faculty member, or to test student interest in a topic which may later be added to the curriculum.

CD341 - Design Studio II: Culture and Audience, 3 credits
This course begins to prepare the student for understanding the audience that design always addresses. As a means to understand audience, we investigate where that is found - a cultural context. Borrowing ideas from anthropology and political economy, students explore graphic design from the perspective of total communication - from the larger issues confronting a society to the discreet objects and messages contained therein. Projects include identity and collateral, produce and brand development, as well as publication design. Prerequisites: CD 241-242, CD 245 and CD 246, or Instructor permission.

CD342 - Design Studio II: Rhetoric and Persuasion, 3 credits
The use of communication design in shaping history, scholarly discourse, the media and even genres such as film and literature, seems transparent. This class will link to the traditional aims of rhetoric (developing a good argument), with becoming a perceptive interpreter. We will investigate the integral role of building solid visual arguments and developing the rhetorical skills to defend a position. Students will be asked to develop an argument on a complex issue and advance that argument through the use of design media such as posters, websites, billboards, etc. Prerequisites: CD241-242, CD245, CD246 and CD341, or Instructor permission.

CD344 - Marketing and Branding, 3 credits
This class is an overview of basic marketing principles and their relevance to the advertising art director and graphic designer. Students will be exposed to product development, pricing, distribution and promotion, merchandising and public relations in consumer and industrial markets and comparing various media, their selection and use. Prerequisites: LA121-122 and CD241-242, or Instructor permission.

CD350 - Interface and Structure, 3 credits
This course serves as an introduction to front-end design and development. Students will cultivate their developmental abilities for the web by focusing on the core technical languages of HTML and CSS. Exploration of current web trends, techniques, and best practices will be emphasized with special attention paid to the role of the modern day professional as a hinge position between aesthetic sensitivity and programmatic rigor. Prerequisites: CD241-242, CD251 or Instructor permission.

CD351 - Motion Graphics, 3 credits
This final course in the web sequence explores the conceptual mash up of art direction and heuristics, visual affordance, narrative, technology, and data. Production values will be stressed and usability concerns will be addressed. Students will create desire with interactive design following the constructs unique to the digital medium and investigate parallels in other design sectors. A variety of design techniques will be taught to challenge aesthetic approaches. Students will become versed in technology, and explore dynamics of project collaboration, client relationships, and principle driven design. Prerequisites: CD241-242, CD251, CD350 or consent of instructor.

CD410 - Graphic Design Special Topics, 3 credits
Special topics courses are approved to take advantage of timely subjects, the expertise of a faculty member, or to test student interest in a topic which may later be added to the curriculum. Prerequisites: Senior standing or Instructor permission.

CD443 - Graphic Design Advanced Studio, 3 credits
Running concurrently with the Practicum and Thesis, students use the opportunity to share their experiences, projects and evaluations. This exchange of information and insight benefits all class members. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

CD444 - Graphic Design Advanced Studio, 3 credits
Running concurrently with the Practicum and Senior Project, students use the opportunity to share their experiences, projects and evaluations. This exchange of information and insight benefits all class members. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

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Creative Writing

CW220 - Writing Special Topics, 3 credits
Special topics courses are approved to take advantage of timely subjects, the expertise of a faculty member, or to test student interest in a topic which may later be added to the curriculum.

CW221 - Introduction to Short Forms, 3 credits
This cross-genre and workshop-based writing course takes as its focus specific concerns of crafting and reading shorter work, including compressed narrative and narrative fragments. Students will read published writing, analyze literature, write original material and offer feedback for the work of their peers. They will gain familiarity with the conventions of the traditional short-story as well as flash fiction, (a.k.a. the “short- short,”) short poetry forms, the ten-minute play, the one-page essay or editorial, the conte, and micro-formats, including social media and the nascent art of serialized literary work delivered in microinstallments via hand-held technology as either self-published material or with indie or corporate representation. Assigned readings will model successful writing, articulate aesthetic values, and offer a platform for discussion and debate. Students will complete a final project which may take the form of a portfolio, creative work with an analytical explication, an anthology with a contextualizing introduction, or other comprehensive work spanning creative, analytic and intellectual processes and production. This course counts as a studio elective for all other areas of concentration. Prerequisite: LA122.

CW223 - Expanded Poetic Fields, 3 credits
This workshop-based writing course includes the study of language-based creative work not dependent upon or highly utilizing a narrative line to sustain or construct meaning, and that foregrounds language’s malleability and potential for expression. Over the course students will investigate and gain an understanding of contemporary poetics and writing for various media. This course welcomes consideration of language as object, of word as symbol, and of image as mark-making alongside written words. Students will read assigned work; consider related images, visual material, and videos; write in class; work on projects outside of class; share work in a guided peer review; complete a substantial final project.

CW224 - Scripting, 3 credits
This course introduces students to the basic terminology, tools and media of contemporary scriptwriting, with specific emphasis and practice in telling stories destined for the stage, television, film, comics, and/or games. Course time will be spent in a combination of lecture blended and peer critique in a workshop setting. Upon successful completion of this course, students will have learned the basics in the craft of scriptwriting, conceived a workable idea, formulated an outline for the expression/ execution of that idea, and made significant work towards a complete and cohesive script for a stage production, television pilot/series, film, comics series/graphic novel, or board/videogame. This course counts as a studio elective for all other areas of concentration. Prerequisite: LA122.

CW225 - Writing with Digital Media, 3 credits
Surveying established and emergent modes of writing across media, this writing-based course augments traditional scholarship with the affordances of digital technology and social media. Drawing on the histories of language and the theories of linguistics and performance, students will explore new possibilities for the articulation and analysis of their ideas. Through various lenses, this course investigates themes such as translation, redaction, immediacy, visibility/invisibility, and various forms of remediation as they are manifest in flash fiction, dead drops, and other new media platforms. The course explores how new technologies depend on and reanimate ancient ways of thinking about language, communication, and meaning making. This course counts as a studio elective for all other areas of concentration. Prerequisite: LA122.

CW320 - Creative Writing Special Topics, 3 credits
Special topics courses are approved to take advantage of timely subjects, the expertise of a faculty member, or to test student interest in a topic which may later be added to the curriculum.

CW322 Lit Zine, 3 credits
During the semester, students will design and publish the BFA in Writing Program’s literary arts journal, which features fiction, creative non-fiction, and poetry and showcases the creative writing work of the BFA in Writing Program and the PNCA community. Students working on the journal will solicit original work by student writers and artists, set up promotional events, and network with writers and publishers within the Portland area and beyond, if desired. They will also workshop their own creative writing. As part of this process, students will study history of small press and independent press literary journals along with the people and movements related to (and responsible for) this history. At the end of the semester, students will organize and host a release party to share their work with the PNCA community. Prerequisites: LA122, or a 200-level Writing course, or Instructor permission.

CW323 - Poetry Intensive, 3 credits
This writing intensive poetry studio course is designed to expose students to a variety of language-driven creative works and to support a rigorous poetry writing practice in its participants. Students will read, hear, and witness the delivery of poetic forms, and will write original work throughout the semester. Assignments, both in class and those to be completed outside of class, will move from idea generation to editing and re-envisioning. Students will present their work for critique several times during the semester and participate in a collaborative project. The final project can take multiple forms, such as a portfolio, chapbook, e-book, or digital installation, etc., and will draw from works produced during the semester, reproducing the professional writing practice of generation, revision and submission or presentation/exhibition. In addition to self-directed independent study of writers chosen by the student, a selection of shared reading assignments will help students frame/consider questions about immediacy and accessibility, narrative, non-linearity, dissonance, collage and other contemporary poetic concepts. In this section, student participation will include workshop, discussion and critique forums, as well as self-directed study. The course will open and close with a discussion around the idea of what and where the poetic exists in a contemporary, media-driven landscape (print publishing, online, performance, etc.). This course counts as a studio elective for all other areas of concentration. Prerequisites: LA122, or a 200-level Writing course, or Instructor permission.

CW324 - Scripting Intensive, 3 credits
This course builds on Introduction to Scripting, giving students creative time to practice and employ methods learned. It focuses on terminology, tools and media of contemporary scriptwriting in consideration of the stage, television, film and/or comics alongside analysis of successful work by professionals in the field. Course time will be spent in a combination of lecture and peer critique in a workshop setting. Upon successful completion of this course, students will have put into practice the basics of the craft of scriptwriting, conceived a workable idea, formulated an outline for the expression/execution of that idea, and maintained creative momentum toward a complete and cohesive script for a stage production, television pilot, film or graphic novel. They will have also closely considered the work of a professional in the field and written a detailed analysis and presentation of that writer's work.This course counts as a studio elective for all other areas of concentration. Prerequisites: LA122, or a 200-level Writing course, or Instructor permission.

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Illustration

DA151 - Design Arts Freshman Elective, 3 credits
In Design Arts Foundation Studio students are introduced to the processes of illustration and graphic design. While both disciplines have distinct characteristics and functions, they are closely linked historically and in contemporary creative practice. This course offers students a strong technical and conceptual framework for a major in Communication Design or Illustration

In weekly experimental studio sessions, students will explore various principles and methodologies from graphic design and illustration, exploring their intersections in contemporary client-based practice. Through incorporation of drawing, typography, painting, collage, and digital media, students will encounter new creative possibilities and find exposure to the dynamic opportunities available to the contemporary illustrator & designer.

IL251 - Word and Image, 3 credits
This course provides an introduction to the verbal/visual relationship of the illustrator's creative process. Students will gain an understanding of the history of illustration as it relates to the contemporary marketplace and the key practitioners of the art form. Self-expression and experimentation are placed within the context of illuminating information through pictures and symbols. Prerequisite: All Foundation studio courses.

IL252 - Visual Techniques, 3 credits
Illustration is an art of illuminating ideas. This course provides the groundwork for developing the ability to communicate effectively through image content. Multiple ways of expressing a visual solution are investigated while working with a variety of contemporary and historical themes and ideas. In addition to the student gaining the conceptual skills needed as an illustrator, technical skills and processes in a number of key media areas will be explored and developed. Prerequisite: IL251.

IL253 - Painting for Illustration, 3 credits
This is a painting class. This class explores the possibilities for self-expression and story-telling with color and composition. Students will build on their knowledge of color theory and composition gained in the Foundation classes, further exploring color systems and how color and texture can be used as compositional elements. Students will gain techniques and knowledge of mediums used with watercolor and acrylic paint. The first part of this class will focus on correct color mixing and understanding of formal elements of composition. In the second part, students will be asked to apply that understanding by manipulating the color and compositional elements in front of them to achieve different effects. The final part of this course is an independent final project proposed by the student, giving him/her an opportunity to apply the skills and techniques learned over the semester to their own choice of subject matter and conceptual content.

IL254 - Digital Media Strategies Photoshop, 3 credits
This class explores Photoshop - modes of digital image making, placing an emphasis on integrating analog and digital illustration processes. Production methodologies related to printing, scanning, and file maintenance will also be addressed. Multiple ways of expressing a visual solution are investigated through a combination of analog techniques (i.e. drawing, painting, composition, perspective, light, value, and color) and digital tools (i.e. Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator). Prerequisites: All Foundation studio courses.

IL255 - Drawing for Illustration, 3 credits
This course builds upon basic drawing skills to extend technical and conceptual range. Differing from Experiments in Drawing, in that it is directed primarily towards the practice and consolidation of observational drawing. These tools include analytical seeing, gesture, measuring, value/volume, linear perspective, composition and varied mark making. This course is intent on tackling varying traditional and non-traditional tactile media less commonly explored in the painting curriculum. Each semester will begin with simple vine charcoal and pencil extending to other media such as watercolor, gouache, pastel, oil pastel, conte and colored pencils. Since each semester highlights a different medium or type of media, this course may be taken singly or out of sequence. This course includes supervised studio work and working from live models, critiques aimed at strengthening compositional skills by examining the coherence of the effects within each composition, possible field trips to outside exhibits or off-campus drawing sites. Work outside of class will be assigned to build skills rehearsed in class. Prerequisite: All Foundation studio courses.

IL256 - Digital Media Strategies Illustrator, 3 credits
This class explores Illustrator - modes of digital image making, placing an emphasis on integrating analog and digital illustration processes. Production methodologies related to printing, scanning, and file maintenance will also be addressed. Multiple ways of expressing a visual solution are investigated through a combination of analog techniques (i.e. drawing, painting, composition, perspective, light, value, and color) and digital tools (i.e. Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator). Prerequisites: All Foundation studio courses.

IL257 - Illustration: Special Topics, 3 credits
Special topics courses are approved to take advantage of timely subjects, the expertise of a faculty member, or to test student interest in a topic which may later be added to the curriculum.

IL351 - Visual Vocabulary, 3 credits
A mature, well-developed personal vision is central to the contemporary illustrators practice. This course focuses on the development of a personal artistic voice - bridging the gap between the boundaries of the commercial marketplace and the highly personal act of making art. In this course, the student will interact with a dynamic variety of themes placed in the context of art direction and time constraints. Refining the highly relational creative process of concept sketch to finished art will be stressed. Prerequisite: IL251-252.

IL352 - Cultural Marketplace, 3 credits
Contemporary culture and the illustration marketplace are fluid and ever changing. It is essential that today's illustrator is equipped to function within this dynamic and competitive landscape. This course takes the student into the current marketplace, exploring each of the key areas of creative opportunity including digital media, games, entertainment, editorial, publishing, advertising, and product development. Each student, while continuing the development of a personal artistic vision, will investigate projects relating to the professional marketplace. Prerequisite: IL251-252 and IL351.

IL354 - Design + Image, 3 credits
In Design + Image students will engage in the vital disciplinary crossover between illustration and graphic design. Through incorporation of drawing, painting, photography, typography, and digital media, students will encounter the countless creative possibilities that hybrid techniques make available to the contemporary illustrator. The class will place special emphasis on the practice of fusing the compositional and conceptual elements of an image. In the end, students should appreciate why Illustrators who understand design are far more likely to create powerfully resonant, compelling images than those who do not. Prerequisites: IL251-252 and IL256.

IL356 - Narrative Image, 3 credits
This course sets the work of the visual artist in an enriching context of writing, ideas and story. The course combines writing, reading and illustration in order to explore the confluence of visual and verbal art, while addressing the need for the modern illustrator to be a multi-dimensional communicator with a strong personal vision. The two disciplines inform and augment each other in bifocal artistic practice. The graphic novel will be explored as a pertinent example of how these skills can work in concert. Through a process of self-expression and experimentation, students are encouraged to develop their own visual vocabulary by studying the work of writers and artists, and practicing personal creation in both realms. Some technical skills will be addressed including reading comprehension, grammar and the writing process. Students will gain fluency in using writing to discover and articulate visual tropes and using images to sharpen, deepen and refine their writing. Prerequisite: IL251 and IL252.

IL357 - Graphic Novel, 3 credits
This course introduces the fundamentals of visual storytelling in the medium of comics and then builds on that foundation through process and experimentation. The course will have a strong focus on three core elements: 1.) Developing and telling a strong story, 2.) Process and creative problem solving 3.) Having the following elements - concept, drawing, design, staging, pacing, and acting - come together in a cohesive way to serve that story. By focusing on a series of smaller narratives, students will develop their storytelling skills, as well as their own narrative voice. They will learn that how one tells a story can be as unique and stylistic as the image or the writing. Practical considerations such as designing and drawing for black and white, the final product, publishing, and professional practices will also be addressed. Prerequisite: IL251-252 or Junior level standing.

IL358 - Illustration: Special Topics, 3 credits
Special topics courses are approved to take advantage of timely subjects, the expertise of a faculty member, or to test student interest in a topic which may later be added to the curriculum. Junior Level.

IL450 - Illustration Advanced Studio I, 3 credits
The advanced studio allows the senior student to apply technical skill and an understanding of the contemporary marketplace to the creation of a body of work related to their own personal vision. Professional work processes will be employed and art direction will be central to this creative process as each student begins the creation of professional level projects related to their chosen area of focus. This 16-week studio course works in close proximity with the Illustration Senior Project, allowing for a broader context leading towards a completed senior portfolio. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

IL451 - Illustration Advanced Studio II, 3 credits
The advanced studio allows the senior student to apply technical skill and an understanding of the contemporary marketplace to the creation of a body of work related to their own personal vision. Professional work processes will be employed and art direction will be central to this creative process as each student begins the creation of professional level projects related to their chosen area of focus. This 16-week studio course works in close proximity with the Illustration Senior Project, allowing for a broader context leading towards a completed senior portfolio. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

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Intermedia

IM201 - Theory & Practice, 3 credits
Theory & Practice classes are interdisciplinary, research oriented studio courses that foster an idea-based, non-media specific inquiry focusing on concerns within and outside the visual arts. Prerequisite: Foundation studio courses and LA122, LA125. Courses offered under this Course #: Theory & Practice: Art in Context - This studio-based, media blind seminar introduces conceptual and theoretical concerns within the context of contemporary creative practice. Topics explored include language and semiotics, appropriation, simulation, systems and networks, collaboration, relational practices, and deconstruction. Through projects, critiques, lectures on contemporary art and ideas, discussions of readings, research and writing, visiting artists, and field trips, students produce studio work utilizing conceptual strategies tied to diverse roles that artists play within contemporary art and creative practice. Minor in Art & Ecology required course: Theory & Practice: Global Culture and Ecology This studio-based, media blind seminar examines climate change and other global issues in order to form a foundational understanding of ecological principles, contemporary global society, and the complex ways that they interact. Students will explore new models of social awareness and cultural production and learn from how artists and designers are already responding in creative ways to social and ecological issues. Through projects, critiques, lectures, discussions of readings, research and writing, visiting artists, and field trips, students will produce studio work reflecting these pressing issues. Prerequisite: Foundation studio courses and LA122, LA125.

IM251 - Performance, 3 credits
This hybrid media studio course will explore a diverse range of strategies in identifying, creating and activating a site through expanded performative actions. Basic skills tied to intended gesture, incidental movement, stillness, repetition, fracture/rupture, prop and site manipulation, voice, language and sound will be the topics and actions explored during this course. Emphasis will be placed on the active, deployed body so a great deal of the course will involve physically engaged solo and collaborative workshops, exercises and activities. Historical precedents and the work of contemporary practitioners will give the student a deeper understanding of the discipline. This exposure coupled with research, projects, critique, proposal development, scoring and scripting techniques, visiting artists, readings, attending performances, and video /film screenings will give the student the primary tools and conceptual strategies to successfully develop performative work. Engagement with PICA's annual TBA festival will give the students exposure to top contemporary time based artists and potential collaborative opportunities with these visiting artists. Prerequisite: All Foundation Studio courses.

IM253 - Intermedia Special Topics, 3 credits
Special topics courses are approved to take advantage of timely subjects, the expertise of a faculty member, or to test student interest in a topic which may later be added to the curriculum.

IM301 - Theory & Practice, 3 credits
Theory & Practice classes are interdisciplinary, research oriented studio courses that foster an idea-based, non-media specific inquiry focusing on concerns within and outside the visual arts. Titles have included: Art & Anthropology, Art and the Everyday, Body Politics, Art - Ethics & Transgression, Utopia/Dystopia, Homeland. Prerequisite: IM201.

IM351 - Intermedia Studio, 3 credits
Intermediate level Intermedia courses - including: Hybrid Painting, Offsite Projects, Screen+Devices, Video Installation, other upper-division hybrid studio courses are offered on a rotational basis. Topics include collaboration, video and sound in non-traditional environments, conceptual work and more involved installation applications. Prerequisite: Junior level standing.

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Liberal Arts

AH210 - Introduction to World Art History, 3 credits
This one-semester survey introduces the student to basic concepts and tenets of art history. Lectures, group discussion and in-class exercises are designed to foster development of the critical and analytical skills needed to pursue more focused study and to help students situate their own practice within the contemporary, global and diverse art world. Thematically organized, the course considers diverse media and samples art and design from a variety of cultures. The course asks students to consider the following questions: Why does art from the past look the way it does? How are the creation, process, appearance, and reception of art dependent on cultural context? How do different cultures express similar ideas differently? How do the subjects, impetuses and goals from the past inform contemporary art? Prerequisite: LA121-122.

AH213 - History of Design Arts, 3 credits
History of Design Arts introduces students to a wide span of eras, cultures, ideas, and practitioners that shaped graphic history and continue to shape it today. Students will examine key historical figures and movements from different vantages, mapping the intersections of design, illustration, and communication through diverse yet overlapping critical lenses. In two-week segments, the class will consider the big picture of graphic history through one of its formative themes to analyze how the forces of culture, media, technology, style, and marketplace have formed the graphic arts through their overlaps, collisions, fusions, and innovations. Through guided discussions, collaborative workshops, and research projects, students will grapple with how design practices throughout history relate to the contemporary state of graphic design and illustration. Prerequisite: AH210.

AH214 - History of Printed Matter, 3 credits
The historical-social context of “print & paper culture” from its historic roots to contemporary culture will be viewed through systems of production & distribution, conditions of power & dissent, knowledge platforms, and the existing and evolving tactics and strategies around communication & visual representation. Philosophies, ideas, practices and personalities of print media and the multiple will be studied through these lenses and will track the influences and rich inspirations from global cultural perspectives. Coursework includes weekly reading selections, two formal analysis essays, a multi-step research project and an in-class presentation. Prerequisite: AH210.

AH215 - History of Object, Space, and Time, 3 credits
This is a course that traces the twentieth century shift in our understanding of three- dimensional art from the Modernist concept of the unique, original, autonomous object to the more contemporary perspective of experience, space and time. It also builds a foundation for approaching sculpture, installation, video and performance work, as well as, developing skills in reading, writing, research and analysis. Laying a firm foundation for students interested in sculpture as well as, interdisciplinary and intermedia practices, this course provides a point of departure for upper division liberal arts classes and contemporary studio critique. Prerequisite: AH210.

AH216 - History of Moving Image, 3 credits
This course charts a history of moving image arts and artists operating within, alongside and in opposition to dominant forms of cinema, television and digital media. We will survey work by video artists, filmmakers, animators and new media artists, critically viewing examples of works that use the tools and techniques of realism, abstraction, appropriation, documentary, and performance. We will inform our understanding of the historical and social context of these works by reading and discussing historical, theoretical, and critical texts that relate to the weekly screenings. In addition, writing assignments, moving image analysis and class discussions will provide students with opportunities to increase and enrich the range of their media literacy skills. Prerequisite: AH210.

AH217 - History of Photography, 3 credits
This course will study a wide range of images, critical theories, and creative practices that have informed photography's social and artistic history. We will examine our contemporary understanding of photography through an investigation of the social discourse and artistic trends that have surrounded photography's evolution. We will look at the evolution of photographic technologies, techniques and images, as well as the various roles photography has served in our culture through design, commercial art, journalism, and emerging photographic media. Our exploration of this material will be made up of weekly readings, discussions, lectures, and independent writing and research. Prerequisite: AH210.

AH218 - History of Painting and Drawing, 3 credits
This History of Painting and Drawing surveys the history, philosophies, practices, and personalities of painting and drawing from their Paleolithic origins to their current status throughout the Western world. Emphasis is given to major works studied in relation to the evolution of style, technical innovations and developments, and the history of ideas. Influences and inspirations of non-Western works will be addressed as pertinent. Hierarchies of the discipline will also be discussed within the canon of the visual arts. For example, we will address the grandeur of history painting in the 18th century French Academy and the inclusion of graffiti into the institution in the late 20th century. Prerequisite: AH210.

AH218 History of Painting and Drawing This History of Painting and Drawing surveys the history, philosophies, practices, and personalities of painting and drawing from their Paleolithic origins to their current status throughout the Western world. Emphasis is given to major works studied in relation to the evolution of style, technical innovations and developments, and the history of ideas. Influences and inspirations of non-Western works will be addressed as pertinent. Hierarchies of the discipline will also be discussed within the canon of the visual arts. For example, we will address the grandeur of history painting in the 18th century French Academy and the inclusion of graffiti into the institution in the late 20th century. Prerequisite: AH210.

AH311 - Art Since 1945, 3 credits
Each semester of this art history survey focuses on developments in the visual arts after WW II primarily of Western traditions, yet with increasing acknowledgement of our global culture. Media covered includes painting, construction and sculpture, environmental art, performance, mixed media, video, and experimental film. AH311 focuses on Abstract Expressionism to Minimalism, while AH312 begins with Post-Minimalism and continues to examine contemporary issues. Both semesters study individual artists and address the ideas and cultural context of visual art and contemporary art criticism. Prerequisites: AH210 and a 200-level "History of ..." class.

AH312 - Contemporary Art History, 3 credits
Each semester of this art history survey focuses on developments in the visual arts after WW II primarily of Western traditions, yet with increasing acknowledgement of our global culture. Media covered includes painting, construction and sculpture, environmental art, performance, mixed media, video, and experimental film. AH 311 focuses on Abstract Expressionism to Minimalism, while AH 312 begins with Post-Minimalism and continues to examine contemporary issues. Both semesters study individual artists and address the ideas and cultural context of visual art and contemporary art criticism. Prerequisites: AH 210 and a 200-level "History of ..." class.

AH319 - Art History Special Topics, 3 credits
Special topics courses are approved to take advantage of timely subjects, the expertise of a faculty member, or to test student interest in a topic which may later be added to the curriculum. Prerequisites: AH210 and a 200-level "History of ..." class.

AH419 - Art History:Special Topics, 3 credits
Special topics courses are approved to take advantage of timely subjects, the expertise of a faculty member, or to test student interest in a topic which may later be added to the curriculum. Prerequisites: LA122, AH210.

LA225 - Society and Culture, 3 credits
The Perspectives on Society and Culture courses aim to introduce students to wider cultural conversations, providing context for deeper inquiry. The course explores fundamental questions and methods in the disciplines found under the umbrella term of social science. Topics will be drawn from Cultural Anthropology, Ethnic Studies, Gender Studies, History, Media Studies, Philosophy, Politics, Psychology, Religious Studies, Sexuality, Social and Environmental Justice, and Sociology. Topics offered on a rotational basis. Prerequisite: LA122 and LA125.

LA321 - Social Science Seminar, 3 credits
The Social Sciences encompass anthropology, geography, history, religion, politics, economics, psychology and sociology. In this upper-division seminar, a selection of topics are offered each semester and studied in a way that offer students the opportunity to study a particular historical period or problem or a specific issue within the social sciences. Students investigate and apply the principles and methods of inquiry and critique, reading a variety of scholarly articles and monographs and completing at least one research project. The course also addresses the relationship of social science to other disciplines and to the arts. Recent offerings include: A History of Expositions, Race in America, and Reconsidering the Good War. Prerequisites: LA121-122, LA225.

LA325 - Literature Seminar, 3 credits
An upper-division literature course on topics related to concerns of the studio artist. Every semester, faculty propose topics and/or forms of literature in which they ask students to actively investigate and participate. Recent offerings include: Poetry, Aesthetics of Ugliness, Ethnic American Experience in Literature and Film, Race in America, Reading the Personal Memoir, Science F(r)iction, Page to Film: Writing and the Movies, and Hippie! Prerequisite: LA121-122.

LA410 - Liberal Arts Special, 3 credits
Topics Liberal Arts Special Topics courses are approved to take advantage of timely subjects, the expertise of a faculty member, or to test student interest in a topic which may later be added to the curriculum. Prerequisites: Senior standing or permission of Department Chair.

LA421 LA521 - Research for a Creative Practice, 3 credits
This course provides a framework for students to examine ideas relevant to their critical investigations and art and design projects, in order to help them contextualize their work in relation to historical, sociopolitical, scientific, and cultural perspectives. Students in this course demonstrate the ability to frame questions and concepts, and to incorporate research methodologies into ongoing inquiry presented through a variety of formats including extended note-taking, annotated Bibliographies, important terms, quotes, and summaries and responses collected in a research journal/log. The emphasis is on research as a process of critical engagement and inquiry in order to observe connections between seemingly disparate ideas, to hone a well-founded point of view, to plan future actions and strategies, to make predictions, and to ask more insightful questions. While this research will inspire creative projects (either in parallel or in the future), the actual projects are outside the scope of this class. Environment (Internal, External and Constructed Worlds): This theme will explore the ways in which we conceptualize and are affected by our surroundings. We will examine the cultural constructs and scientific underpinnings of environmental; sustainable; wilderness; development and other terminology derived from our socio-economic discourse, and the way these concepts interact with our internal psychology and exists as part of our governance structure. Research topics include issues of climate change, international aid, pollution, environmental justice, policy and law, psychology, evolution and the mind. Prerequisite: Senior or second semester Junior standing, or permission of Instructor or Liberal Arts Chair.

MTH101A - Mathematics: Geometry, 3 credits
Geometry: subjects may include Topology, Knot Theory, Symmetry, Polyhedral or other Models. Mathematics courses inspire you to critically and imaginatively engage with a complex and evolving world increasingly influenced by data, technology and science. The curriculum emphasizes research, debate and creative inquiry; cultivates an appreciation of beautiful ideas and powerful methods; and empowers your with the analytical tools, research skills, and knowledge base to reason logically, to argue persuasively, and to interpret theories in science and mathematics through a creative and considered lens. Prerequisite: None

MTH101B - Mathematics: Mathematical Modelling, 3 credits
Mathematics: Modelling: may include Algebra, Calculus, Linear Algebra, Differential Equations. Mathematics courses inspire you to critically and imaginatively engage with a complex and evolving world increasingly influenced by data, technology and science. The curriculum emphasizes research, debate and creative inquiry; cultivates an appreciation of beautiful ideas and powerful methods; and empowers your with the analytical tools, research skills, and knowledge base to reason logically, to argue persuasively, and to interpret theories in science and mathematics through a creative and considered lens. Prerequisite: None

MTH101C Mathematics: Number Theory, 3 credits
Number Theory, Cryptography, Data Mining and Analysis, Discrete Mathematics. Mathematics courses inspire you to critically and imaginatively engage with a complex and evolving world increasingly influenced by data, technology and science. The curriculum emphasizes research, debate and creative inquiry; cultivates an appreciation of beautiful ideas and powerful methods; and empowers your with the analytical tools, research skills, and knowledge base to reason logically, to argue persuasively, and to interpret theories in science and mathematics through a creative and considered lens. Prerequisite: None

MTH101D - Mathematics: Probability and Statistics, 3 credits
Probability and Statistics, Game Theory, Financial Mathematics. Mathematics courses inspire you to critically and imaginatively engage with a complex and evolving world increasingly influenced by data, technology and science. The curriculum emphasizes research, debate and creative inquiry; cultivates an appreciation of beautiful ideas and powerful methods; and empowers your with the analytical tools, research skills, and knowledge base to reason logically, to argue persuasively, and to interpret theories in science and mathematics through a creative and considered lens. Prerequisite: None

MTH101E - Mathematics: Computer Science, 3 credits
Topics Include Programming, Mathematical and Boolean Logic, Algorithms, Data Structures. Mathematics courses inspire you to critically and imaginatively engage with a complex and evolving world increasingly influenced by data, technology and science. The curriculum emphasizes research, debate and creative inquiry; cultivates an appreciation of beautiful ideas and powerful methods; and empowers your with the analytical tools, research skills, and knowledge base to reason logically, to argue persuasively, and to interpret theories in science and mathematics through a creative and considered lens. Prerequisite: None

MTH101F Mathematics: Physics, 3 credits
Topics are quantitative methods only and must include trigonometry/calculus. Mathematics courses inspire you to critically and imaginatively engage with a complex and evolving world increasingly influenced by data, technology and science. The curriculum emphasizes research, debate and creative inquiry; cultivates an appreciation of beautiful ideas and powerful methods; and empowers your with the analytical tools, research skills, and knowledge base to reason logically, to argue persuasively, and to interpret theories in science and mathematics through a creative and considered lens. Prerequisite: None

SCI223 - Natural Science, 3 credits
Each semester of this science class introduces and explores the scientific worldview and its impact on the contemporary landscape and society through a variety of windows. Students learn scientific vocabulary and principles, practice empirical interpretation of the physical world, are introduced to current research areas, and investigate parallels between science, sociology, and the arts. Topics range from global to local interests including: Global Environmental Issues, Food Production and our Environment, Evolution, and Plant Ecology of the Pacific Northwest. Prerequisite: LA122.

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Painting

DR261 - The Figure, 3 credits
This is a drawing class that takes as its subject the human form, generally nude but at times draped. As such, it combines rigorous drawing instruction and practice to develop students’ formal expressive capacities along with an investigation of ideas that naturally come to bear on art that concerns itself directly with representation of humankind. Class discussions and assignments will reflect this dual approach to the figure. Most class time will be spent in drawing, but you may expect frequent short lectures on specific artists and issues, and are encouraged to ask questions and participate in discussions. Prerequisite: All Foundation studio courses or permission of the instructor.

DR265 - Drawing Studio: Techniques & Applications, 3 credits
This course builds upon basic drawing skills to extend technical and conceptual range. This course is directed primarily towards the practice of observational drawing, relying on analytical seeing, gesture, measuring, value/volume, linear perspective, composition and varied mark making. Beginning with simple vine charcoal and pencil, the course extends to a range of other drawing media such as watercolor, gouache, pastel, oil pastel, conte and colored pencils. Each semester may emphasize different media or types of media, depending upon the individual expertise of instructors. This course includes supervised studio work and working from live models, critiques aimed at strengthening compositional skills by examining the coherence of the effects within each composition, possible field trips to outside exhibits or off-campus drawing site. Prerequisite: All Foundation studio courses or permission of the instructor.

DR266 - Drawing Studio: Image in Context, 3 credits
While this course is designed to improve both perceptual and conceptual skills the primary emphasis is on experimentation with materials and strategies for invention. Problems are structured around a variety of spatial concepts, subject matters, materials and methods for image generation and supported with examples of contemporary and historical artwork. Critiques are structured around both visual coherence and engagement with subjects or concepts under consideration. Prerequisite: All Foundation studio courses or permission of instructor.

DR267 - Anatomy, 3 credits
This is a one-semester course in anatomy designed to strengthen your ability to represent the human figure in art. It begins with a close examination of the skeleton, followed by an introduction to the mechanics of movement and musculature, plus a survey of the main muscle groups. Each week includes a lecture-demonstration using skeletons, charts, live models and our own bodies, followed by drawing from the live model, and three outside hours of drawing using notes, memory and your imagination. Very hard; lots of fun. Prerequisites: All Foundation studio courses or permission of the instructor.

DR361 - Advanced Figure, 3 credits
This course is the advanced sequel to DR261 The Figure. As such it aims toward significant mastery of representation and interpretation of the human figure in drawing. Students receive advanced instruction in formal and expressive drawing within the context of contemporary artistic practice. The course is structured around hands-on drawing but includes presentations on contemporary and historical figurative art along with short independent projects. Prerequisite: DR261 or permission of the instructor.

DR363 - Drawing Seminar: Drawing and Meaning, 3 credits
The intent of this course is to introduce historical, technical and conceptual frameworks to help support individual investigations through drawing practice. As a tool of creative exploration, drawing informs visual discovery and envisions the development of perceptions and ideas. This is an advanced level drawing course for students who are interested in developing a self-directed, sustained body of work and an understanding of the relationships between the formal and conceptual aspects of drawing practice. All work is developed outside the classroom and supported in the classroom by individual and group critiques, guest critiques, written proposals, and readings. Prerequisites: DR261 or DR265 or DR266 or DR267.

DR364 - Drawing Seminar: Systems, Strategies, and Structures, 3 credits
The history of drawing predated written language and remains a fundamental means to translate, document, record and analyze our thoughts and observations to ourselves and others. Contemporary drawing practice may be transitory and temporal or provide a record of archival permanence. It may be propositional, preparatory, visionary, imaginative, associative, factual, generative, transforming or performative in nature as a tool of investigation for the realization and transference of ideas. At its best the means of making is harnessed to the realization of ideas and concepts. To that end student will engage in a variety of strategies and means to explore and express their ideas through drawing. Prerequisite: DR261 or DR265 or DR266 or DR267.

PA261 - Painting Studio:Materials & Methods, 3 credits
The Painting program builds on Foundation skills of drawing, design, color theory and critical discourse. Projects focus on the materials and methods of traditional oil painting while exploring a variety of subjects and pictorial strategies. Emphasis is on the development of core skills in the discipline, knowledge of contemporary and historical work as well as critical judgment and presentation. Prerequisite: All Foundation studio courses, or permission of the instructor.

PA262 - Painting Std: Techniques & Applications, 3 credits
The second semester of the Painting Studio program is meant to help you consolidate the paint-handling skills introduced in Materials and Methods and extend the range of painting approaches you undertake. Problems assigned may involve representation or abstraction, or both, and may require working from direct observation, memory or imagination, or all three. As in the first semester, class problems will be considered in the context of related work by historical and contemporary masters, and we will also work on refining your ability to describe and analyze your own work and that of others in critique. Students may be called upon to work in oils or acrylics, according to the preference of the instructor. Prerequisite: PA261 or permission of the instructor.

PA266 - Observational Painting, 3 credits
This course is intended to provide the student with a variety of opportunities to expand and refine their skill in a realist manner by painting from direct observation. From 'Plein Air" to "in-studio" practice, on subjects such as Landscape, the Figure, Portrait and Still Life, we will focus on creating work that is technically skilled and of strong pictorial construction. To this end, Drawing and preliminary studies are a few of the tools we will use as well as lectures, Gallery visits and "on site" demonstrations. Perspective, rendering in atmospheric color, color saturation, underpainting and glazing techniques are also things that will be important components of our class. For the most part we will be creating one painting each session however a few subjects such as the Figure and the Portrait will require an additional week. Prerequisites: All Foundation studio courses.

PADR361 - Painting and Drawing Studio: Self-Directed, 3 credits
This is the first in a two-course sequence of self-directed study in the Junior year. It aims to begin development of both studio discipline and a professional approach to artistic practice. After an initial project assigned by the professor, Students will be expected to articulate their aims and interests in a written proposal which will form the basis of the semester’s work. This proposal will be developed with the assistance of the professor and should be specific enough to provide appropriate structure but with sufficient leeway for development and change. Students may work in drawing, painting, or some combination of these or other media. Progress in the course will be supported by individual instruction, short lectures, visiting artists, gallery visits, appropriate library and other research resources, and group discussion.

PADR362 - Painting and Drawing Studio: Pre-Thesis, 3 credit
This course directly precedes the Thesis and as such can be seen as a preparatory course for transition to entirely independent work in the Senior year. It aims to develop both studio discipline and a professional approach to artistic practice. Students will be expected to articulate their aims and interests in a written proposal which will form the basis of the semester’s work. This proposal will be developed with the assistance of the professor and should be specific enough to provide appropriate structure but with sufficient leeway for development and change. Students may work in drawing, painting, or some combination of these or other media. Progress in the course will be supported by individual instruction, short lectures, visiting artists, gallery visits, appropriate library and other research resources, and group discussion.

PADR365 - Special Topics, 3 credits
Special topics courses are approved to take advantage of timely subjects, the expertise of a faculty member, or to test student interest in a topic which may later be added to the curriculum.

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Photography

PH265 - Introduction to the Photographic Image, 3 credits
Introduction to the Photographic Image is a class that explores multiple paths by which to generate, manipulate and interrogate photographic content and pursue the wide array of platforms on which photographic images are experienced (i.e. paper, screen, and object). The expansive definition of a camera will be investigated through the use of iPhones, scanners, video cameras, photograms, and digital negatives as tools for creating photographic images. Skills taught will include digital SLR manual camera functions, an introduction to darkroom processes, and basic Adobe Lightroom workflow. Assignments, lectures and readings will provide a comprehensive overview of the photographic image in the media and art world and will challenge students to interrogate photography as they know it.

PH272 - Concept / Capture / Print I, 3 credits
This studio course examines every step of the photographic workflow, encouraging students to align formal choices related to composition, exposure, editing and presentation with their conceptual intent. Using both digital SLR and medium format film cameras, students will scan film and import RAW files, using Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop as processing tools. Technical instruction will focus on manual camera functions, shooting with available light, simple modifiers and fill flash, custom white balancing, retouching, post-production digital manipulations, and large format inkjet printing. Conceptual development will be emphasized and students will practice articulating ideas verbally and visually, creating coherent bodies of work based on assignments. Through readings and lectures, students will be exposed to contemporary photographic practices and theories. Prerequisite: FD102 Visual Elements: Digital Tools.

PH273 - Studio Lighting Essentials, 3 credits
Studio Lighting Essentials teaches lighting techniques both in and out of the studio that can be applied to the practices of students working in various mediums from photography to animation to video. Students will learn to work with continuous tungsten lights as well as off camera strobe speed lights in a variety of situations using modifiers and grip equipment. Understanding light on form, shadows and lighting ratios are concepts that will be covered, as well as color management and digital workflow using digital SLR cameras. Assignments, readings and lectures will expose students to contemporary and historic photographic lighting techniques in both fine art and commercial contexts. Prerequisites: FD102 Visual Elements Digital Tools, FD102 Visual Elements 2D.

PH274 - Photographic Investigations, 3 credits
Photographic Investigations is a class that allows students the opportunity to explore a specific application of the photographic medium and participate in rich dialogue around historic and contemporary approaches. Topics for investigation are offered on rotation and include:

Alternative Processes: Introduces students to a variety of alternative photographic processes as a means to artistic expression with a focus on contemporary concerns. Students will experiment with antique photo processes as well as newer imaging technologies, interfacing the traditional with digital advances.

Analog Practices: A darkroom based class focused on analog black and white photography in which students will learn film exposure, camera functions, darkroom processes, and the use of natural and available light.

Fashion Photography: Explores themes of fashion photography in contemporary artistic as well as commercial contexts. Skills taught include considerations of concept, pre-production, set design, styling, lighting, post production, model contracts, and other professional practice elements of the industry.

Product Photography: Explores language and aesthetics of advertising photography and its dialogue with fine art photography. Skills taught include concept, set design, lighting strategies, capture and post production, client contracts, and other professional practice elements of the industry.

Documentary Photography: Investigates the history of documentary photography while working with assignments that push students to ask questions of ethics, practice and aesthetics in their own work.

PH371 - Photographic Practice & Research, 3 credits
In this course students work on a term-long project using the 4x5 view camera. One on one meetings with the instructor and in-progress critiques will give students feedback on their work throughout the term. Weekly readings and class discussions will cover photographic criticism and theory from the 1920’s to today. Prerequisite: All Foundation studio courses, PH272, PH273 and one other 200 level photography class.

PH372 - Photographic in Contemporary Art, 3 credits
This course investigates contemporary photographic ways of seeing and creating, exploring work that expands beyond the boundaries of the photographic print. This class is about experimentation and students are expected to take risks, producing work that challenges their normal mode of art-making. There is an emphasis on critical theory and students are urged to make connections between their studio practice and critical literary knowledge. Weekly readings and discussions will inform the work and aid students in placing their work in a historical context.

PH374 - Studio Lighting, 3 credits
As a continuation of PH273 Lighting Essentials, this course will focus on the manipulation and control of photographic lighting to align with conceptual intent. Students will work with strobe light kits and a wide range of modifiers and grip equipment both in and out of the studio. They will practice mixing available light, tungsten and flash in complex lighting scenarios while using both digital and medium format film cameras. Professional practice will be taught through consideration of scenarios that involve working with clients, drawing up contracts and collaborating in groups. Assignments, readings and lectures will expose students to contemporary and historic photographic lighting techniques in both fine art and commercial contexts. Prerequisite: PH273, PH272.

PH375 - Concept / Capture / Print II, 3 credits
As a continuation of PH272 Concept / Capture / Print I, this course will focus on aligning formal choices in capture, post-production and print processes with conceptual intent. An advanced investigation of digital capture, Adobe Photoshop, Lightroom, color management and digital workflow will be pursued as we examine the whats and whys of industry standards and learn a wide range of professional approaches to post-production editing. Through written project proposals, readings, and lectures students will be encouraged to develop their practice in relation to contemporary issues in fine art photography. Professional practice is integrated into the class through field trips to photography studios, discussion of marketing strategies and a final project that centers around the presentation of a body of work in book format. Prerequisite: All Foundation studio courses, PH272 or Instructor consent.

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Printmaking

PR281 - Intaglio + Relief, 3 credits
This beginning printmaking course introduces intaglio and relief printing techniques within an active, hands-on studio experience. With a keen eye towards craft, composition, concept and engagement, this course explores the unique and varied visual effects and pragmatic considerations of copperplate intaglio and relief printing. Intaglio processes will include drypoint, hard ground and soft ground techniques on copper plates. The developing, working, and reworking of plates will be supported through step etching and scraping and burnishing. Relief printing techniques will include components of both Japanese and Western carving, inking, and printing traditions. Linoleum and woodcut printing will be covered in single and multiple blocks. Image and mark-making, line and value, strategies of layering, and composition are discussed and developed in both techniques. Current and historical applications of intaglio and relief printing for artists and designers will be a focus during the course. A program of demonstrations, lectures, in-class projects, readings & discussions, visiting artists, and individual & group critiques will support student exploration. 12 student capacity. Prerequisites: Foundations 2D-Design and/or Basic Drawing.

PR282 - Screen + Lithography, 3 credits
This beginning printmaking course introduces screen- and lithography-printing techniques within an active, hands-on studio experience. With a keen eye towards craft, composition, concept and engagement, this course explores the unique and varied visual effects and pragmatic considerations of screenprinting and lithography printing. Screenprinting techniques will include hand-made, digital, and drawn stencils, as well as direct-to-screen and photo-processes. Lithography printing techniques will include drawing and printing directly from lithography stones, and the photographic capabilities of plate lithography. Image and markmaking, color interaction, strategies of layering, and composition are discussed and developed in both techniques. Current and historical applications of lithography and screenprinting for artists and designers will be a focus during the course. A program of demonstrations, lectures, in-class projects, readings & discussions, visiting artists, and individual & group critiques will support student exploration. 12 student capacity. Prerequisites: Foundations 2D-Design and/or Basic Drawing

PR286 - Letterpress + Book, 3 credits
This beginning printmaking course introduces letterpress & book-making techniques within an active, hands-on studio experience. With a keen eye towards craft, composition, concept and engagement, this course explores the ways that letterpress and books can function separately or interact. Letterpress techniques will focus on myriad applications of the typesetting and printing of lead & wood type, photopolymer plates, and other image-making processes. Traditional and non-traditional bookbinding will be introduced, including sewn and adhesive bindings. Alongside technical concerns, this course introduces the historical and contemporary considerations of print, paper & book culture as well as sequencing, narrative, typography, and the relationship between text and image. Current applications in letterpress and book for artists and designers, as well as how we read prints, texts and books, will be a focus during the course. A program of demonstrations, lectures, in-class projects, readings & discussions, visiting artists, and individual & group critiques will support student exploration.

PR289 - Printmaking: Special Topics, 3 credits
Special topics courses are approved to take advantage of timely subjects, the expertise of a faculty member, or to test student interest in a topic which may later be added to the curriculum.

PR370 - Printstallation, 3 credits
Printstallation is an intermediate printmaking course that examines the role of printed matter in and as installation. Students will utilize and expand upon techniques gained in beginning printmaking classes while completing print-based installation projects. This course encompasses all methods of printed media and students are encouraged to employ multiple techniques and strategies. Print-based installation through accumulation & scale, print’s interaction with other media & forms, prints as objects, and the active role of printed take-aways will all be considered. Strategies around site specificity, temporality, interactivity, immersion, and distribution are also integral to this course. Historical and contemporary artists working in print-based installation will be viewed and discussed. A program of demonstrations, lectures, in-class projects, readings & discussions, visiting artists, and individual & group critiques will support student exploration. Prerequisites: at least one 200-level printmaking class, two or more strongly encouraged.

PR371 - Print Studio, 3 credits
Print Studio is an intermediate printmaking course where students can focus on and refine one or two printmaking techniques – honing technical skills and expanding knowledge around craft, materials, and processes. Self-directed projects that employ printmaking toward personal, idiosyncratic voice and vision are supported by faculty and peers in this studio course. Building off of skills learned in beginning printmaking classes, students will propose and focus on extended projects, ideas, and print processes. Skills in professional writing, research, presentation, documentation, and exhibition will also be supported. This course is ideal for students wishing to gain a greater depth of knowledge in specific printmaking traditions while creating a focused body of work. A program of demonstrations, lectures, in-class projects, readings & discussions, visiting artists, and individual & group critiques will support student exploration. Prerequisites: at least one 200-level printmaking class, two or more strongly encouraged

PR372 - Printing on Fabric, 3 credits
Printing on Fabric - Printing on Fabric, an intermediate printmaking course, primarily focuses on screenprinting on fabric, but will also cover relief printing, intaglio, pochoir, and some small-batch fabric dyeing. Utilizing and expanding upon techniques gained in beginning printmaking classes, students will learn how to successfully print on fabric. Students will employ their printed fabric in multiple ways while utilizing strategies of apparel/wearables, interior design, sculpture and installation. Pattern repeats, non-repeating imagery, and printing on yardage will all be covered alongside printing on previously sewn textiles. Historical and contemporary artists/designers working in and with printed textiles will be viewed and discussed. A program of demonstrations, lectures, in-class projects, readings & discussions, visiting artists, and individual & group critiques will support student exploration. Prerequisite: 200-level Screenprint is required, 200-level Relief and/or Intaglio are recommended.

PR385 - Experiments in Combined Print Media, 3 credits
Experiments in Combined Print Media is an intermediate print course that focuses on strategies for creating work that combines traditional and non-traditional print based media and a wide range of image sources. In addition, students will explore ways of combining print media with non-printed media, three-dimensional objects, and time-based media. The work created in this course requests openness to the possibility of how printed media can function from a framed image on a wall to a wide variety of contexts. In addition to assigned projects and recommended readings, there will be critiques, image lectures on related work with an emphasis on contemporary practice and context. Prerequisite: Minimum of two 200 level Print studio courses or permission of instructor. This course also fulfills the Junior interdisciplinary Intermedia requirement.

PR389 - Printmaking:Special Topics, 3 credits
Special topics courses are approved to take advantage of timely subjects, the expertise of a faculty member, or to test student interest in a topic which may later be added to the curriculum. Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission of Department Chair.

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Sculpture

These courses are offered at a 200 or 300 level with the different learning outcomes and expectations clearly defined. Students taking a studio course at a 300 level must have previously completed a 200 level course or have received permission to enroll from the instructor. Prerequisites for 200 level: All Foundation studio credits.

SC291/391 - Ceramics, 3 credits
This class introduces the student to wheel and hand building techniques, clay bodies, kiln firing and glazing strategies. With the acquisition of these basic skills, the student can begin to build competency in clay, slip and glaze handling and develop a sustaining personal vocabulary of form, surface, content and context. Prerequisites: All Foundation studio credits.

SC291/391 - Fabrication Techniques-Metal and Wood, 3 credits
This course will provide the student with a variety of techniques and approaches for fabricating with both wood and metal. Traditional techniques including wood joinery methods, laminating, woodturning, mild steel shaping and welding, TIG welding, and brazing will be taught in addition to more creative and unique fabrication techniques.

Shop, material and tool safety and project/time management strategies will also be part of the course. The techniques learned will help bring your ideas, designs and imaginings into stable, dimensional reality. Prerequisites: All Foundation studio credits.

SC291/391 - Moldmaking, 3 credits
This course explores the primary tools, materials, and processes used in mold making technology as it relates to contemporary sculptural practice. An overview of various methods of both rigid and flexible mold making will be explored as well as both solid and hollow shell casting techniques and materials. There will be an emphasis on studio etiquette, craftsmanship and production as well as creative applications of mold making and casting. Students will also be exposed to contemporary artists who utilize mold making as a central part of their practice. Prerequisites: All Foundation studio credits.

SC291/391 - Multiples, 3 credits
Many approaches to making sculpture involve concerns of the multiple either through simple reproductive strategies, duplicating, serializing or sequencing elements within the imagery. Further, many concerns for "objectness" in sculpture often involve thematic or conceptual connections contrasting ideas of the singular with the other-the present with the past or future (change) perhaps with particular places, sites or concerns of identity- or conversations implied through contrasting materiality. This course concentrates on several of the more focal concerns that these strategies can bring to bear on three-dimensional image making. We will concentrate on three elements, or general themes, implied by constructs involving multiples in imagery with an assignment in each of the following areas: The original, the module and the transformed.

SC291/391 - Soft Sculpture, 3 credits
Soft Sculpture is designed as a studio class that is technique and assignment driven with lectures to contextualize the work. We will knit, make patterns, inflate, sew (hand and with the machines), draw, crochet, felt, stuff, bake, shoot images, videotape, perform, experiment, etc. I will encourage students to try new things and stretch our understanding of what SOFT can be. By definition SOFT is an adjective with many meanings - pleasing to the senses, mellow flavor, subdued, quiet, smooth, delicate, balmy, mild, easy, gradual rising, having curved outlines, tender, kind, low key, impressionable, feeble, not firm, spreadable, low energy and it can also be a noun. We will develop a working visual and verbal vocabulary drawn from historical precedents as well as contemporary practices and trial and error. We will begin to identify and understand deeper intent in our work through applying what we are learning, reading, discussions, field trips, sketchbooks and critiques. Prerequisites: All Foundation studio credits.

SC291/391 - Experimenting With Materials, 3 credits
The focus of this studio class is to give the students the freedom to experiment with new materials without the pressure of the finished piece. Critiques will be based on a discussion of the process, successes and 'failures' and potentially will lead to content and concept, though the ideas are not the emphasis here. Class time will be used to research materials, costs, artists working this way and to understand the materials potential uses and meanings. The process of creating these works will be the majority of class time, trying several approaches to achieve a basic level of mastery. Workshops, lectures and readings will drive our material choices. Prerequisites: All Foundation studio credits.

SC291/391 - Activated Objects, 3 credits
The focus for this course will be on the activated object. Pulling the forms off the pedestal and wall and giving them a secondary or expanded function beyond the formal and static. We will be constructing objects, interventions, props, tools and models that will explore notions of use, function, application, task and performance. This arena will be a rich space to deploy poetic metaphors, present social challenges, reveal personal predilections and dynamically activate the spaces between maker, object, audience and impact. Prerequisites: All Foundation studio credits.

SC291/391 - The Figure, 3 credits
This course will focus on obtaining the skills necessary to depict the human form from life, and truly learning how to observe and work from the model. Students will become adept with proportion and scale, and will learn how to make gestures in clay, build armatures, and create a finished figure sculpture. Students will become familiar with the different clays and sculpting tools available. At the completion of this course, the students will be comfortable in visualizing 3D forms in clay and how to develop their own sculptural styles and techniques. Students at this level also begin experimentation with a range of alternative materials and process that support current practices in contemporary art. The course will provide an introduction to the theoretical perspective of the past, present and future state of figure sculpture concerns. Prerequisites: All Foundation studio credits.

SC291/391 - Object Design/Digital Fabrication, 3 credits
This is an introductory course to fundamentals of functional object design and fabrication. Students are exposed to a variety of planning approaches, prototyping techniques, and digital fabrication tools as a means of supplementing their studio practice with new and emerging technologies. Students engage in a design practice, which integrates technical knowledge and skills with material, form and contextual issues in contemporary design. Longer projects will allow for development of individual pursuits in three-dimensional design; this can include furniture, industrial design products, and artistic structures among others. Prerequisites: All Foundation studio credits.

SC391/410 - Material, Process, Idea, 3 credits
This studio class is designed to immerse students in the complex interrelationship of their ideas, working methods, material choices and language through independently directed bodies of work and through research and experimentation and refined, concentrated approaches to sculptural problems. Students will be asked to investigate, establish and refine the interrelated influences that direct their specific making. They will be asked to refine their verbal language to become more fluent in both discussing and defending the specifics of their concerns and to connect those concerns to broader conversations. They will also be asked to refine their visual language and align it with the materials and processes they employ. Virtually any sort of working project will be possible as long as it engages the sculptural language or an interest in where sculptural ideas bump into imagery more commonly placed outside the sculptural discourse. Students may start with familiar imagery, materials and processes— Track similar projects or interests they have underway in new ways or that are sourced in different media or disciplines— or they may wish to break new ground and explore and establish entirely new ways of communicating through making. Projects and trajectories will be negotiated with the instructor. Prerequisites: All Foundation studio credits.

SC394 - Sculpture: Special Topics - 3 credits
Sculpture Special topics courses are approved to take advantage of timely subjects, the expertise of a faculty member, or to test student interest in a topic which may later be added to the curriculum. Prerequisite: Junior standing

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Video and Sound

VID211 - Beginning Video, 3 credits
This lower division studio course will explore video as a distinct medium and will encourage an understanding of sound-image relationships. Topics include fundamentals of video editing and production, camera use, sound acquisition, framing, composition, content and context, coverage, sequencing, and linear and non-linear narrative structures. Premiere Pro will be the primary software used in this course. An understanding of video and sound will be gained through lectures on historical and contemporary applications and ideas, hands on exercises, projects, research and writing, visiting artists, discussions of readings as well as film and video screenings. Prerequisites: All Foundation studio courses.

VID212 - Beginning Sound, 3 credits
This lower division studio course examines sound in the context of audio-visual media and as a medium in its own right. The principles, vocabularies and strategies of sound-image relationships will be explored through viewings, listening, lectures, readings, and visiting artists. Examples will be drawn from cinema, video art, experimental music and sound art. Students will develop techniques and skills for recording, editing, and composing sound and voice. Increased proficiency in Soundtrack Pro will build on and complement Final Cut Pro training from Time Arts. Additional audio software such as Audacity will be introduced. Projects will apply concepts to hands-on artistic practice, encouraging creative problem solving and aesthetic risk-taking. Critiques will develop the articulation of sound-image relationships, personal intentions and observations of other's work, using precise and medium-specific vocabulary.

VID213 - Video Strategies, 3 credits
This studio course focuses on developing a critical awareness of the techniques and conventions that structure our experience of fiction and nonfiction video. The first section of the course is a close examination of how the components of video combine to yield an overall sense of form: narrative, mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing, and sound. The next two sections of the course investigate a variety of modes of making and thinking about video, including histories and traditions within the medium, as well as critical and theoretical frameworks. Through studio projects, critiques, readings, written assignments, lectures, screenings, class visits from specialists, and ongoing reflection, students will develop a common vocabulary and base of knowledge from which to continue further study of video and sound. Prerequisites: All Foundation studio courses.

VID311 - Intermediate Video, 3 credits
This upper division studio course will explore single channel video as a distinct medium. From conception to distribution, we will examine the role of artist-made video in our culture while simultaneously honing our technical knowledge of the medium. Building on fundamental video and sound skills, this course presents advanced techniques for capturing and editing video such as compositing, lighting, and camera movement. Our investigations will encourage fuller understanding of sound-image relationships, advanced methods for making videos, and exhibition possibilities for completed work. Screenings, readings, visiting speakers, and discussions tied to contemporary video practices will provide a context for creating individual projects. Prerequisite: VID212.

VID312 - Intermediate Sound, 3 credits
This upper division studio course will explore sound as a medium in its own right. Advanced audio expertise will be developed through recording, composing, mixing, scoring and improvisation. Experiential exercises in sonic ethnography will ground our discussions in everyday life and demonstrate acoustic principles, while improvisation workshops will develop sonic perception and communication. Studio projects will focus on principles of form and signification while strengthening fundamental engineering techniques, through practical interactions with microphones, mixers, hardware and software. Examples will be drawn from a wide range of sources, including historical and contemporary sound art, popular and avant-garde music and interdisciplinary contemporary arts. Students will learn to connect artistic intentions to compositional structures and gain methods for integrating expanded sonic resources into their broader practice. Prerequisites: VID212.

VID313 - Screens and Devices, 3 credits
This course investigates the role of artists in relation to mobile screens, portable media players, smart phones and other network enabled digital devices. In individual and group projects and exercises, students will explore both the intended modes of digital media production and the possibilities for novel forms of expression. In parallel with the rich histories of, and intersections between, art, technology and the cultural imagination, a versatile, cross-platform approach to problem solving will be cultivated. Emphasizing the value of experimental research, creative inquiry and collaborative production models, students will develop adaptive strategies applicable in a wide range of professional context. Prerequisite: VID211-212.

VID314 - Projection, Sound, and Space, 3 credits
This upper division studio course will explore the use of video and sound as tools to activate space. Building on fundamental skills, this course will liberate video and sound from the confines of the single-screen viewing environment by encouraging multidimensional approaches. Students will examine spatial variables including architecture, scale, acoustics, sculpture, multiples, sound levels, and luminosity. Additionally, students will gain an understanding of how time-specific elements such as cycling, synchronization, and duration interact with space. Screenings, readings, visiting speakers, and discussions tied to contemporary video and sound practices will help students understand their work in a broader context. Individual and collaborative projects in this course will provide opportunities for understanding image-sound-space relationships, developing an independent voice, and planning exhibitions. Prerequisites: VID211 and VID212.

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Non-Departmental

ND300 - Independent Study, 1-3 credits
Independent Study Contracts are available in the Academic Affairs Office. They require the approval of the Department Chair and Academic Dean. Independent Study is for the purpose of studies which are not incorporated into the curricula of regular classes. Students are encouraged to enroll in regularly scheduled courses whenever possible. Many studio courses may be repeated for additional credit. Independent Study may not be used to add additional credit to an existing course. The student is restricted to no more than one Independent Study per semester. One credit of Independent Study requires 3 hours of work per week for 15 weeks, or 45 hours of work. Faculty contact is defined as 3 hours per credit per semester, with meeting times arranged. Studio work: Independent Study is available only to full-time Junior or Senior class level students. An Independent Study may be for no more than 3 studio credits. Independent Study in Liberal Arts is available to all levels, no more than 3 credits per semester.

ND301 - Internship, 1-6 credits
An art-related work experience administered by the Career Center Office. Internships, graded on a pass/fail basis, may range from 1 to 6 credits, at a ratio of 45 hours of work per credit. Available to juniors and seniors.

ND301b - PENSOLE Design Intensive, 15 credits
Design Intensive students will experience a breadth of academic topics in a holistic setting: Professional Practices, Communication Practices, Design Process, Research Methods, Prototype Development, Digital Imaging/CAD, Materials+Process, Color Fundamentals/Color Strategy. Students are exposed to the expectations of the professional environment in the design industry. Emphasis is placed on developing students’ presentation skills, resumes, preparation for job interviews, development of professional portfolios, websites, and networking."

ND302 - Global Studios, 3 credits
The PNCA Global Studios Program is founded on the principles of experiential education and intended to lead students to engage in creative practice in unfamiliar cultural settings. A high standard of creative practice in the contemporary world is an understanding of the communicative value and effect of work on a global stage.

ND303 - Semester Abroad, 12 credits
PNCA students are encouraged to spend a semester abroad with one of our exchange partners or program affiliates. Contact the Academic Advisor International for details of available programs and eligibility requirements.

ND305 AICAD Mobility Program, 12 credits
Students can spend one semester in their junior year at a sister art school within the US or Canada. Participating schools are members of AICAD (Association of Independent Colleges of Art & Design). Not all AICAD members participate in this program so see Student Handbook for list of participants. Students apply in their sophomore year and can apply to more than one school. If accepted, the student pays PNCA tuition, but will be responsible for any non-tuition fees required by the Host institution.

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Design Arts Thesis

DA400 - Design Arts Thesis, 3 credits
The BFA Thesis is a creative project and related writing elements that are developed in conjunction with one another and whose form and content are informed by research. Each student completes a coherent body of work or a substantial singular project that evolves from the student’s creative practice and demonstrates vision, thought, competence, and an understanding of the work’s historical and social context and reflects the maturity of the artist. The Thesis Project will be completed during the second semester of the student’s senior year and presented during Focus Week of that semester. Prerequisite: Senior standing and IL450 and DA453, or CD443 and DA445.

DA410 - Design Arts Special Topics, 3 credits
Special topics courses are approved to take advantage of timely subjects, the expertise of a faculty member, or to test student interest in a topic which may later be added to the curriculum. Prerequisites: Senior standing or Instructor permission.

DA441 - Design Arts Internship, 3 credits
Design Arts students with junior or senior standing are placed with cooperating employers for approximately 9 hours per week. Employers include designers, design firms, advertising agencies and other creative firms. Within the actual creative environment, students are able to sharpen their skills, gain confidence and have practical work experiences that are invaluable.Before registering, students must apply directly to an internship site and receive confirmation of acceptance. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing or consent of Department Chair.

DA445 - Center for Design, 3 credits
The Center for Design is a student -staffed design studio located on campus. Art direction for the variety of client projects is provided by PNCA faculty. In addition to developing a large body of work for a portfolio the student will have an insider's look the complicated interactions of a working design studio where art and business meet. Student designers are chosen based on portfolio review. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing or permission of Department Chair.

DA453 - Design Arts Thesis Development, 3 credits
This course provides an in-depth exploration into the daily practice of the professional Designer or Illustrator, equipping the student with the skills and knowledge to effectively enter the professional job market. Central to this work is the preparation & building of a final portfolio in both web & traditional formats. The primary goal of this course is the development of a Design Arts Thesis Proposal. This comprehensive project, while having a clear independent language, will also function as a conceptually and visually integrated component of the student’s final graduation portfolio. Additionally, the course is designed to engage each student in a comprehensive investigation of creative professional practice with a strong emphasis on client-based application and entrepreneurial studies. Ultimately, students will form the basis of a creative strategy for life beyond PNCA. Students will engage in systems and methodologies for the creation of complex, multi-level design and image-based project proposals presented visually, verbally, and in writing. They will sharpen their analytical & conceptual skills, broaden their ability to place their work within historical, cultural and theoretical contexts and create a consistent voice in their visual, written and oral communication. In collaboration with the other 400 level courses, Design Arts Thesis Development begins a rigorous & inspiring senior year experience that integrates art making, design strategies, and contemporary creative business practices. Prerequisites: IL351-356, CD351-356

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Media Arts Thesis

MA300 - Media Arts Professional Practice, 3 credits
During the course of this semester each student will build professional strategies, further develop their portfolio, identify audiences and establish life habits, using recently completed creative projects, resources culled from their digital archive, tied to future planning and aspirational goals. Based upon awareness of students existing strengths and need for further development, the course prepares students for a successful Thesis year and the pursuit of postgraduate and/or professional pathways. Through iteration, research, and practice, students will complete this course with a digital portfolio, resource archive, visual and verbal presentation skills and a practical and conceptual framework toward professional pathways. Prerequisites: second semester Junior standing.

TH401 Thesis Critique Seminar, 3 credits
This course provides a forum for developing, researching, presenting and critiquing an independent studio practice, resulting in the final execution of a thesis project the following term. The curriculum is designed to support the first semester thesis student as they address issues of context, audience, methods and strategies relating to contemporary practice and individual expression. Classes will be cross-departmental and students will participate in individual and group critiques, discussions, written assignments and presentations. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

MA400 Media Arts Thesis, 3 credits
The BFA Thesis is a creative project and related writing elements that are developed in conjunction with one another and whose form and content are informed by research. Each student completes a coherent body of work or a substantial singular project that evolves from the student’s creative practice and demonstrates vision, thought, competence, and an understanding of the work’s historical and social context and reflects the maturity of the artist. The Thesis Project will be completed during the second semester of the student’s senior year and presented during Focus Week of that semester. Prerequisite: Senior standing and TH401.

MA410 Media Arts Special, 3 credits
Topics Special topics courses are approved to take advantage of timely subjects, the expertise of a faculty member, or to test student interest in a topic which may later be added to the curriculum.

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Studio Arts Thesis

SA300 - Studio Arts, 3 credits
Professional Practice "During the course of this semester each student will build professional strategies, further develop their portfolio, identify audiences and establish life habits, using recently completed creative projects, resources culled from their digital archive, tied to future planning and aspirational goals. Based upon awareness of students existing strengths and need for further development, the course prepares students for a successful Thesis year and the pursuit of postgraduate and/or professional pathways. Through iteration, research, and practice, students will complete this course with a digital portfolio, resource archive, visual and verbal presentation skills and a practical and conceptual framework toward professional pathways. Prerequisites: second semester junior standing.

TH401 - Thesis Critique Seminar, 3 credits
This course provides a forum for developing, researching, presenting and critiquing an independent studio practice, resulting in the final execution of a thesis project the following term. The curriculum is designed to support the first semester thesis student as they address issues of context, audience, methods and strategies relating to contemporary practice and individual expression. Classes will be cross-departmental and students will participate in individual and group critiques, discussions, written assignments and presentations. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

SA400 - Studio Arts Thesis, 3 credits
The BFA Thesis is a creative project and related writing elements that are developed in conjunction with one another and whose form and content are informed by research. Each student completes a coherent body of work or a substantial singular project that evolves from the student’s creative practice and demonstrates vision, thought, competence, and an understanding of the work’s historical and social context and reflects the maturity of the artist. The Thesis Project will be completed during the second semester of the student’s senior year and presented during Focus Week of that semester. Prerequisite: Senior standing and TH401.

SA410 - Studio Arts Special Topics, 3 credits
Studio Arts Special topics courses are approved to take advantage of timely subjects, the expertise of a faculty member, or to test student interest in a topic which may later be added to the curriculum. Prerequisites: Senior standing or permission of Deptartment Chair.