PNCA Students and Faculty Join Global Climate Strike

September 19, 2019

Media Alert


September 19, 2019

Contact: Lisa Radon, lradon@pnca.edu

Portland, OR—September 19, 2019—On Friday, September 20, 2019, students, faculty, and members of the staff of the Pacific Northwest College of Art are participating in the Global Climate Strike, a call to action led by students across the globe to raise awareness for climate justice. These students are calling for a mass mobilization to demand climate action from world governments. More than 1,700 strikes are planned in more than 150 countries.

PNCA community members will gather on the front steps of the main campus building at 511 NW Broadway at 9:45 am on Friday, to walk to City Hall together to the planned rally at 10:30am. From there, the march proceeds across the Hawthorne Bridge to a Climate Strike Festival outside OMSI from 12-5pm.

PNCA students are not bystanders in culture. The foundational core of their creative expression is to be agents of change—to engage in the critical dialogues of our times. PNCA’s Core Themes, which guide the school’s curriculum and the implementation of its mission support critical inquiry, giving students the tools to examine existing and emerging cultural, social and political conditions and to make informed judgments. PNCA supports a global understanding of the world, encouraging an understanding of diverse cultures and teaching students to recognize the interconnectedness of both natural and human systems.

“On September 20, PNCA students and faculty will publicly bring these principles to the Global Climate Strike, making clear that we walk our talk, that we value justice, equity, and peace in the world,” a statement drafted by a group of faculty and students reads. “We will voice our clear support for immediate global climate action and our strong belief that, as culture-makers, artists and designers have the power the change the world, and that with that power, we also have a responsibility to positively impact social, ecological, cultural, and political change.”

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